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A quarter of all GCSE students receive A / A * equivalent grades


A record percentage of GCSE entries in England today received the equivalent of A * or As after a government U-turn, meaning results could be based on teachers' estimated grades on canceled exams.

Hundreds of thousands of teens got their results this morning at 8am after major changes – but around 200,000 Btec students will not receive their final results after a last minute review of grades.

More than one in four GCSE participants (25.9 percent) in England got one of the top three grades of 7 to 9 this year, up from just over a fifth (20.7 percent) last summer, according to the Ofqual Examination Board figures occupy.

The proportion getting the top grades – at least a 7 or an A grade – is a record high based on the data available after a decision was made to award grades based on teachers' ratings rather than an algorithm.

More than three out of four entries (76 percent) received at least a 4 or C grade this summer in England, an increase of 8.9 percentage points over the previous year, when 67.1 percent achieved the grades.

It comes after GCSE and A-Level students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland were told that if they heard an outcry, they would get either their teachers' higher grade or the moderated grade. In other developments today:

  • 500,000 BTEC students have to wait another week to receive their grades after the examination board removes the results.
  • Frustrated students and parents had to wait for GCSE results after their email didn't arrive at 8 a.m.
  • School Secretary Nick Gibb has apologized to students for the "pain and fear" they felt before the U-turn.
  • Thousands of A-Level entries have been updated after a major U-turn in the distribution of results.
  • It is still unclear what the appeal process will look like for students who are unhappy with their results after the U-turn.

Last week, almost two out of five (39.1 percent) of the A-level grades submitted by schools and universities in England – around 280,000 entries in total – were adjusted after moderation.

Examination boards had moderated the grades – using an algorithm from Ofqual – to ensure that this year's results were not significantly higher than before and that the value of the students' grades was not undermined.

Conventional A * -G GCSE types have been scrapped and replaced in England with a 9-1 system with 9 the highest score. A 4 largely corresponds to a C grade and a 7 largely corresponds to an A.

Students who earn GCSE scores this summer will receive numerical grades for all subjects as all courses have now switched to the new grading system.

Btec grades weren't included in the original U-turn, but at 4:30 p.m. yesterday – just hours left until the results were released at 8:00 a.m. – Pearson said it would re-evaluate Btecs to "address injustice concerns."

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands respond when they receive their GCSE results today

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands respond when they receive their GCSE results today

Students react when they review their GCSE scores today at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire

Students respond when they review their GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire today

A student reacts after reading her GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

A student reacts after reading her GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

Ellie Barnes is receiving her GCSE results with her parents at Bewdley School in Worcestershire this morning

Ellie Barnes is receiving her GCSE results with her parents at Bewdley School in Worcestershire this morning

A high school student reviews her GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire this morning

A high school student reviews her GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire this morning

A student reacts as she reviews her GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire, this morning

A student reacts as she reviews her GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire, this morning

Principle Tim Dainty is today examining Brenda Cinotti's GCSE results at the Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London

Principle Tim Dainty is today examining Brenda Cinotti's GCSE results at the Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London

The Examination Board urged schools and colleges not to publish Level 1 and 2 results in professional qualifications on Thursday to give them more time to recalculate grades. School Secretary Nick Gibb has apologized to students for the "pain and fear" they experienced before the U-turn this week.

He told BBC Breakfast, “To these hundreds of thousands of young people getting their GCSE grades and the A-level students getting recalculated grades, I want to say this, congratulations on what you have achieved.

The success rate at A-Level rises to an all-time high after the U-turn

Thousands of A-Level entries have been updated after a major U-turn in the distribution of results.

The proportion of A-Level attendees getting an A grade or higher has risen to a record high for England. 38.1 percent received the top marks.

When this year's results were first published last week as part of the controversial moderation system, 27.6 percent of the contributions achieved an A or higher.

Meanwhile, the success rate for grades A * to E has risen to an all-time high of 99.7 percent for England, compared to 98.2 percent achieved in last Thursday's results, according to the examination board Ofqual, Show.

It came after the government announced that students could receive grades based on school or college ratings, rather than an algorithm, after thousands of scores were downgraded on Aug. 13.

Before the government's U-turn, the examination boards in England had downgraded almost two out of five grades (39.1 percent), according to Qfqual – the equivalent of around 280,000 entries that were adjusted after moderation.

In total, 35.6 percent of the grades were reduced by one grade, 3.3 percent by two grades and 0.2 percent by three grades.

Teachers were asked to submit the grades they believed any student would have received if they had taken the papers along with a ranking of students after exams were canceled during the Covid-19 pandemic.

However, the examination boards moderated the grades to ensure that this year's results were not significantly higher than before and that the value of the students' grades was not undermined.

Approximately 15,000 students who have been turned down by their university of choice now meet the bid conditions set for post-U-turn.

Ucas (University and College Admissions Service) said universities had "exercised flexibility" after analyzing results from the four largest registrars for 160,000 students who received an improved high school diploma in England.

They showed that around 100,000 of these students had already secured a place at their university of choice on the day of the results last Thursday.

Of the remaining 60,000 students, roughly one in four, roughly 15,000, will now meet the A-level offering requirements of their original first-choice university, Ucas said.

“But also how sorry I am for the pain, fear and insecurity they have suffered as a result of the assessment problems we encountered last week. And to reassure them that we are doing everything we can to solve these problems. & # 39;

A student named Hannah, who is attending high school at Wirral, told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “I'm definitely less stressed, now they said we get the predicted grades from what the teachers said, or the algorithm grade when it's higher, which is a much fairer system, but there is still a lot of stress because it's a pretty big day.

“I want to study biology, psychology and history. I think it might be a problem that everyone is essentially going to bloat their grade, but part of me thinks we don't all just have better grades this one year.

“We didn't exactly expect this whole situation to happen, and it is an extremely unique set of circumstances. I don't think it's a massive issue for everyone to have an inflated grade because we all thought we were going to take exams earlier this year.

“Obviously we were told that all exams have been canceled so there isn't really much that needs to be done (study). But if we had to resign for any reason, I don't think it will be possible as we have literally not studied any GCSE content in six months. & # 39;

Mr Gibb said he hoped the students would get their Btec results next week. When asked when they will get their grades, Mr Gibb told the BBC, “As soon as possible, but I hope next week.

Pearson is working to correct, review, and reissue these notes. And we are working closely with Ucas and the independent regulators and review boards to ensure that no young person is put at a disadvantage as a result of this delay. & # 39;

He added, "Having spoken to Pearson and all of the review boards yesterday, I believe they will be delivered next week."

It is still unclear what the appointment process will look like for GCSE and A-level students who are unhappy with their results after the U-turn.

However, the UK Examination Board previously said that individual students would not be allowed to question grades graded by teachers.

Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), expects staff to have "challenging" interviews with GCSE students who are dissatisfied with the results.

He said a sixth grade college was threatened with a lawyer and had to deal with "abusive" parents after "all hell broke loose" last week over the colleges' estimated high school grades.

Mr. Barton said yesterday before GCSE Results Day, “I think it will repeat itself tomorrow. I think people expect difficult conversations.

"It becomes a misunderstanding of" This is a single teacher. & # 39; She didn't like me. That's why she wrote me down. & # 39; & # 39;

Overall, more students are expected to receive higher GCSE grades this year than in previous years, Barton said.

He added, "This is because the schools understandably gave some students the benefit of the doubt when they were on the boundary between two classes and had the ability to advance to the higher class."

Colleges are urgently calling for more government funding to cope with a likely increase in students who, on the U-turn, may meet sixth grade college admission requirements.

GCSE RESULTS FOR 2020 COMPARED TO 2019
OBJECT 2020 number of candidates 2020 grades 7 to 9 (%) 2020 grades 4 to 9 (%) 2020 class 1 to 9 (%) 2019: number of candidates 2019: Grade 7 to 9 (%) 2019: Grade 4 to 9 (%) 2019: Grade 1 to 9 (%)
Art and design 190400 29.6 86.4 99.9 182204 22.7 75.1 99.6
biology 165251 52.8 94.6 99.9 165318 42.3 89.6 99.3
Business administration 91386 27.9 80 99.7 89067 17.9 65.5 98.7
chemistry 158643 53.2 95.7 100 159082 43.9 90 99.4
Citizenship Studies 21902 22.6 75.3 99.2 19701 16.9 66 97.7
C.lAssian themes 15727 74.6 97.1 99.9 15491 63.9 90.7 99.1
Computing 75730 33.5 80.1 99.3 77407 21.6 62.6 96.7
Design technology 88872 27.6 79 99.7 89903 19.4 63.2 98.4
theatre 57808 36.7 87.2 99.9 57704 23.4 74.2 99.4
economy 6501 46.8 92.6 100 6106 31.8 81.6 99.3
engineering 2818 26.4 76.8 99.6 2917 11.3 50.6 97.5
English 733551 18.7 71.2 99.6 707059 13.9 61.8 98.7
English literature 558591 24.3 79.7 99.4 546677 20.2 73.4 98.3
Food preparation and nutrition 47131 24.6 78.6 99.9 44925 17.7 64.4 99.4
French 124043 29.9 82.1 99.9 122803 23.7 69.7 98.5
geography 255344 30.1 75.5 99.5 251121 24.5 65.2 98.3
German 40688 34.1 86.8 99.9 41222 24.2 75.8 98.7
history 273778 29.4 74.5 99.1 261537 24.6 63.6 97
mathematics 734301 19th 66.6 99.3 720098 15.9 59.6 97.7
Media / film / television studies 34657 24.4 80.5 99.8 36437 17th 66.7 98.5
music 34665 46 89.2 99.9 34725 31.8 75.6 99.1
Other modern languages 22276 68.6 94.9 99.5 30997 66 90.3 97.6
Other sciences 2560 59.2 92.5 99.8 2543 42.2 81.3 98.7
Performing / expressive arts 8996 38.5 87.6 99.9 9273 23.4 71.7 99.3
physical education 73685 33.4 85.6 100 79388 21.1 71.8 99.8
physics 157410 53 96.1 100 157819 43.8 90.8 99.4
Religious Studies 225719 34.9 80.5 99.5 227913 30.5 72.3 98.5
Science: Double Prize (2) 814708 10.5 64.5 99.6 778626 7.5 55.4 97.9
Social science subjects 38093 27.2 78.3 99.6 37743 18.1 62.9 98.2
Spanish 103992 32.5 81.8 99.8 96811 27.1 70.3 98.2
statistics 23765 28 83.3 99.7 23044 19.7 72.5 98
ALL SCHOOL SUBJECTS 5182991 25.9 76 99.6 5075675 20.7 67.1 98.3

Some colleges are already at full capacity and the number of students they can take in as part of the Covid-19 pandemic is limited, according to the Sixth Form Colleges Association (SFCA).

Ofqual & # 39; knew the algorithm was doomed & # 39;

Watchdog Ofqual knew its algorithm was "doomed" in June, a whistleblower claimed last night.

On condition of anonymity, a consultant who helped develop the software said it was obvious there would be winners and losers once schools submitted grades graded by teachers between June 1 and 12.

"There was a very specific point where it was doomed," he said. “There was clearly always some potential that this, by its very nature, could explode. It wasn't even necessary to discuss this point because it was always in the background. & # 39;

Another blow against Gavin Williamson also alleged that the Secretary of Education was personally warned of the algorithm's flaws last month.

Sir Jon Coles, a former board member of the Department of Education who helped found Ofqual, reportedly told Mr. Williamson that the algorithm was only 75 percent accurate. Mr Williamson and Mr Jon discussed the problem in July, but the minister decided to support the algorithm anyway, The Times reported.

Labor peer Lord Falconer has reportedly said the algorithm is illegal. Ofqual and the Ministry of Education did not respond to requests for comment.

James Kewin, vice chairman of the SFCA, told PA: "In many ways, the immediate challenges faced by sixth grade colleges reflect the challenges faced by universities, the increased demand for space and the pressures on space from Covid-19 Restrictions. "

Last year, one in five participants (20.7%) in England received at least a grade of 7 or A, and around two-thirds (67.1%) of the contributions in England received a grade of at least 4 or C.

An analysis by the FFT Education Datalab research unit has shown that disadvantaged students could benefit from this this year as the performance gap could narrow in the U-turn.

Lower-graduate schools seem to have given the most generous grades in their teacher rating, the researchers said.

It added, "It is possible that we can see fewer discrepancies between improving outcomes in independent schools and state schools."

Traditional A * G grades were discarded and replaced with a 9-1 system, with 9 scoring the highest score. A 4 largely corresponds to a C grade and a 7 largely corresponds to an A.

Students who earn GCSE scores this summer will receive numerical grades for all subjects as all courses have now been migrated to the new grading system.

Mr Gibb said he had been warned of concerns that the algorithm used to determine grades could affect poorer students.

He was asked about reports in The Times that Sir Jon Coles, a former director general of the Department of Education, wrote to Mr. Williamson earlier last month to express concerns about the algorithm Ofqual used.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4's Today program, Mr Gibb said, “He (Sir John) spoke to me about it and he was concerned about the model and that it would particularly disadvantage children from poorer backgrounds.

"So I've called a meeting with Ofqual, the independent regulator, to discuss these concerns in depth."

Mr. Gibb revealed that it was "certainly foreseen" that private high school students could benefit from using the algorithm.

A student reacts as she reviews her GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire today

A student reacts as she reviews her GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire today

Students react as they review their GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

Students react as they review their GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

A student this morning reviews his GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire

A student reviews his GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire this morning

Chloe Orrin hugs a friend after opening her GCSE results at Ffynone House School in Swansea, South Wales today

Chloe Orrin hugs a friend after opening her GCSE results at Ffynone House School in Swansea, South Wales today

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react as they receive their GCSE results this morning

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react as they receive their GCSE results this morning

The Education Minister said: "This was certainly intended because we knew that small cohorts had to rely more on the teacher-graded grade than the standardization process, but this was true for both the state and independent sectors."

Durham offers cash rewards to students who agree to defer a year

Durham became the first university last night to offer cash rewards to students if they agreed to defer a year.

The university announced this after it was found that 15,000 students can now switch back to their first choice institution.

Durham's offer will anger some struggling universities that were alleged last night to face "financially crippling" losses as students look for initial decisions.

It is feared that an increased number of students waiting a year to get to their university of choice rather than downgrading to a less respected alternative that year could create a financial black hole for less popular institutions.

Durham said it had "capacity issues, both in terms of tuition and accommodation," and warned, "it is possible that some offer holders … will have to postpone entry to 2021 in order to enroll".

It told prospective students, "Students who choose to postpone until 2021 will be guaranteed college housing in 2021 and will be provided with a scholarship from Durham to help them transition into university life."

Last night, Ucas said that students who were originally rejected by their first choice university could now claim a spot with their updated grades.

The Russell group of elite universities will likely take the brunt of these additional student numbers and put pressure on staff to take in as many students as possible.

Mr. Gibb also defended the model by which grades were assessed as "fair" but said it was misplaced.

He said: “It was always my priority that no young person from a disadvantaged background would standardize his grades more than other young people.

“There was about a 2 percent difference, which we saw broadly in last week's national scores, as opposed to what we saw in Scotland, where there was a huge gap between disadvantaged students.

“And that's because in this country we had more data on previous youth attainment that was built into the model.

“So the model itself was fair, it was very popular, it was widely consulted – the problem arose in the way in which the three phases of applying this model – the historical data of the school, the previous achievement of the cohort of Students at the school and then the national standard correction – it is the element of applying the model that I think there is concern. & # 39;

Mr. Gibb said, “The model was a good model and we have continued to refine it. The application of the model is a regulatory approach that was developed on Thursday when the algorithm was published.

& # 39; And by that point, it became clear that there were some results released on Thursday and Friday that were just not accurate and not what the model wanted.

"It was not intended that a young person who had worked diligently on his high school graduation for two years and was expecting an A and two Bs or three As and showed up at school to get his grades and was three Ds."

The sixth grades are demanding additional funding from the government, with some leaders planning to hire more teachers or ask staff to teach beyond their specialist knowledge so they can meet whatever offers are on offer.

Others may increase the class size or give catch-up classes to students whose grades do not match their actual abilities.

Professor Alan Smithers, director of the Center for Education and Employment Research at Buckingham University, said the new system will reward students and schools where teachers have "overrated". He added, “It is difficult for those who have tried their best to predict accurately.

“Young people will feel that they are good at something when they are not, and they may find that they can and may not be able to graduate from difficult subjects like physics, French or maths getting ready. & # 39;

A mother of a student reacts as she reviews his GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

A mother of a student reacts as she reviews his GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

Carys Nelson reacts after opening her GCSE results at Ffynone House school in Swansea, South Wales this morning

Carys Nelson reacts after opening her GCSE results at Ffynone House school in Swansea, South Wales this morning

A student reacts after receiving her GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

A student reacts after receiving her GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

A student reviews his GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire this morning

A student reviews his GCSE scores at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire this morning

A student reviews her GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

A student reviews her GCSE results at the Ark Academy in London this morning

In July, exam attendant Ofqual revealed an early analysis of predicted GCSE grades submitted by teachers.

The Queen's granddaughter, Lady Louise Windsor, will receive her results today

The Queen's granddaughter, Lady Louise Windsor, is among the thousands of students receiving her GCSE results.

Lady Louise, 16-year-old daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex, attends school in Ascot, Berkshire.

The teen was preparing for her exams before schools closed in March during the lockdown.

Lady Louise Windsor at the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials in Stamford, Lincolnshire, last September

Lady Louise Windsor at the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials in Stamford, Lincolnshire, last September

As with other students across the country, their scores will be based on their teachers' estimates if they are higher than the controversial moderated grades after the government's U-turn amid the debacle over this year's exams.

Buckingham Palace said Lady Louise's findings were a private matter.

In an interview with the Sunday Times in June, Sophie revealed her hopes that her daughter would go to college because she is "pretty smart."

Lady Louise, who will be staying to get her high school diploma, had studied diligently for her GCSEs before they were canceled.

The Countess revealed: “She works hard and is going to graduate from high school. I hope she goes to university. I wouldn't force her, but if she wants to. She's pretty smart. & # 39;

The Countess of Wessex and her daughter Lady Louise Windsor left the Queen's Christmas dinner at Buckingham Palace in London last December

The Countess of Wessex and her daughter Lady Louise Windsor left the Queen's Christmas dinner at Buckingham Palace in London last December

Sophie has said that Lady Louise and her younger brother Viscount Severn are expected to make a living and will likely never use HRH styles as adults.

“We try to raise them to understand that they will very likely have to work for a living. So we decided not to use HRH titles. You have them and can use them from the age of 18 but I think that's highly unlikely, ”she said.

Lady Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary Mountbatten-Windsor was born prematurely in November 2003 and weighed only 4 pounds 9 ounces.

In the eighth month of pregnancy, Sophie was rushed to the hospital with severe internal pain and the doctors found she was dangerously ill from blood loss and performed an emergency caesarean section.

The newborn Lady Louise was taken to St. George's Hospital in Tooting, London for specialist treatment, while the Countess stayed at Frimley Park Hospital near her home in Bagshot Park. They were separated for six days.

The Queen's second youngest grandchild was a bridesmaid for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in 2011 and was a special companion at Princess Eugenie's wedding in 2018 to accompany the young bridesmaids and bellboys to church.

She occasionally accompanies her mother at events and takes part in royal celebrations such as Trooping The Color.

A few years ago, Lady Louise had a successful operation to correct an eye disease.

The teenager has also started competing in carriage driving and has followed in the footsteps of her grandfather the Duke of Edinburgh by taking up the sport.

During her childhood she saw a lot of the Queen, with whom she bears a strong resemblance at the same age.

As the daughter of the sovereign's son, Lady Louise, who ranks in 13th place on the throne, has the right to be known as Princess Louise.

Aber der Graf und die Gräfin entschieden sich dagegen und wählten stattdessen die Höflichkeitstitel eines Grafenkindes für ihre Tochter und ihren Sohn.

It was found that 31.6 percent of papers set by 16 year olds in England would get a 7 or higher (an old A or A *) if these center rating grades were used. That compared to 24.7 percent for this age group last year – an increase of 28 percent.

According to this teacher evaluation system, 7.7 percent of the work would receive a top grade of 9. And 82.4 percent would get at least a 4, which equates to a C, Ofqual said.

At the time, the watchdog said the "vast majority of centers" had "submitted optimistic marks for centers".

John Abbott, executive director of Richard Huish College in Somerset, said it was likely that "more kids are likely to be on the wrong course in September".

This is because they may have received higher grades than they would have won on exams or would have fallen behind during the lockdown.

Gill Burbridge, director of Leyton Sixth Form College in east London, said it was a challenge to appreciate the offerings it made to nearly 2,000 students. She added, "The staff may need more flexibility to teach in more than one area."

James Kewin, vice chairman of the board of directors of the Sixth Form Colleges Association, said, "We have urged the government over the past few years to establish a capital expansion fund for sixth grade providers and urgent action is needed now."

The Department of Education said, "We are continuing to focus on working with Ofqual to ensure students get their final GCSE, AS and A-Level scores this week."

Bildungsminister Gavin Williamson sagte: "Ich weiß, wie schwierig dieses Jahr für Schüler aufgrund des Ausbruchs des Coronavirus war, weil sie nicht im Klassenzimmer und nicht bei ihren Freunden sein mussten."

Er fügte hinzu: "Die Studenten können sich jetzt auf spannende Gelegenheiten freuen. In diesem Jahr haben sie die Wahl, unsere bahnbrechenden T-Levels zu studieren, oder sie können ein Abitur machen, eine Lehre aufnehmen oder aus einer Reihe anderer beruflicher Qualifikationen wählen."

Labor shadow education secretary Kate Green has asked her counterpart to publish all of his correspondence about the use of a controversial evaluation algorithm.

In a statement, she said, “Gavin Williamson was repeatedly warned about the problems with the scoring algorithm, and each time he did nothing.

'Dieses endlose Muster der Inkompetenz ist keine Möglichkeit, ein Land zu regieren. Sein Versäumnis, auf Warnungen zu hören und auf sie zu reagieren, riskierte, dass Tausende junger Menschen ihrer Zukunft beraubt wurden.

'Es ist Zeit für volle Transparenz. It is now urgent for the Department of Education to publish all correspondence with and from the Foreign Minister discussing concerns about this algorithm.

"Young people deserve to know how they were made to be so disappointed."

In der Zwischenzeit weigerte sich der schottische Tory-Führer Douglas Ross, Herrn Williamson zu unterstützen, und sagte, er solle "darüber nachdenken, was passiert ist".

Herr Ross, der den schottischen Bildungsminister John Swinney aufgefordert hatte, seinen Job nach der Kehrtwende dort zu verlieren, schlug vor, dass der englische Minister schneller handeln sollte, sobald die Probleme in Schottland offensichtlich wurden.

"Ich denke, Gavin Williamson und die Regierung und das Bildungsministerium werden darüber nachdenken, warum sie das Problem, mit dem sich die SNP aufgrund ihrer Aktionen in Schottland befassen musste, nicht gesehen haben", sagte er gegenüber BBC Radio Scotland.

Auf die Frage, ob Herr Williamson kündigen sollte, sagte Herr Ross: „Das ist eine Entscheidung für Gavin Williamson. Es ist eine Entscheidung für den Premierminister, wenn er weiterhin das Vertrauen des Premierministers hat.

„Ich bin nicht hier, um in Ihrem Bericht zu sagen, dass Gavin Williamson meiner Meinung nach großartige Arbeit geleistet hat und er sollte weitermachen.

"Ich denke, er muss darüber nachdenken, was mit so vielen Schülern in England passiert ist, Studenten, die vier Tage lang besorgt waren, weil wir hier oben in Schottland eine Woche lang genau dasselbe hatten."

Inzwischen sind Hunderttausende von BTEC-Schülern, die heute ihre Ergebnisse erwarten, enttäuscht – nach einer Entscheidung in letzter Minute, sie neu zu bewerten.

Ein Prüfungsausschuss, der für die berufliche Qualifikation verantwortlich ist, möchte mehr Zeit, um die Bewertung nach der Gesamtbewertung Fisaco richtig zu machen.

Aber es gab Wut, dass die Colleges gestern erst um 16.30 Uhr über den Umzug informiert wurden.

Leora Cruddas, Geschäftsführerin der Confederation of School Trusts, sagte gestern Abend: "Es ist einfach inakzeptabel, dass einige der am stärksten benachteiligten Schüler morgen ihre Noten nicht erhalten und dass in den letzten Tagen nichts unternommen wurde, um dies zu korrigieren."

Die Entscheidung folgt der Ankündigung Anfang dieser Woche, dass GCSE- und A-Level-Schüler Noten erhalten könnten, die auf den Schätzungen ihrer Lehrer basieren, anstatt auf einem Computeralgorithmus.

Schüler, die die berufliche BTEC-Qualifikation erworben haben, wurden in dieser Ankündigung nicht berücksichtigt.

Jetzt möchte das Prüfungsgremium Pearson „die gleichen Grundsätze anwenden“, die in Abschlüssen und GCSEs angewendet werden, nachdem besorgte Schüler, die diese Prüfungen ablegen, einen unfairen Vorteil gegenüber BTEC-Schülern erhalten haben.

It will be regrading BTECs awarded last week – as well those that were due to be released today.

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react as they receive their GCSE results this morning

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react as they receive their GCSE results this morning

A student at Ark Academy in London today

Parents and a student react after checking the GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

Parents and a student react after checking the GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

A student holds her hand over her mouth after reading her GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

A student holds her hand over her mouth after reading her GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

Joshua Fessahaye looks over his GCSE results with his mother at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London today

Joshua Fessahaye looks over his GCSE results with his mother at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London today

Chloe Orrin smiles as she checks her GCSE results at Ffynone House School in Swansea, South Wales, this morning

Chloe Orrin smiles as she checks her GCSE results at Ffynone House School in Swansea, South Wales, this morning

Diego Da Silva looks at his GCSE results with his father at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London this morning

Diego Da Silva looks at his GCSE results with his father at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London this morning

(From left) Brenda Cinotti, Joshua Fessahaye and Adriana Fernandes Martins at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London today

(From left) Brenda Cinotti, Joshua Fessahaye and Adriana Fernandes Martins at Ark Evelyn Grace Academy in London today

This will involve stripping out the parts of its grades that had been calculated by the algorithm using historical performance data – and using teachers' predictions instead. Colleges have been told not to hand out results for the vocational qualification in the meantime.

Sixth form college pupil's medical degree dream hangs by a thread

Sosan Mirafgan's dream of studying medicine is still pending

Sosan Mirafgan's dream of studying medicine is still pending

For Sosan Mirafgan, the dream of studying medicine still hangs in the balance.

The soaring sixth grade college student, 18, lost her place at Newcastle University after the evaluation fiasco.

Her teacher-predicted Bs grades in biology and chemistry were downgraded to Cs, but she kept her A in math. She contacted the university after the exams reversed to see if it is now accepted. But they said it was waiting for advice from the Medical Schools Council.

The industry association said that students wishing to study medicine and dentistry are in "a uniquely difficult situation" as these courses have "severely limited access" and are mostly full. Sosan, who wants to become a brain surgeon, said, “The university said they might have to give us a place for the next year. I'm still waiting, nervous about what's going to happen. & # 39;

Sosan didn't speak English when she arrived from Afghanistan as an asylum seeker in 2012. Even so, she achieved eight GCSEs between the ages of 5 and 8 at the Thornaby Academy in Stockton-on-Tees.

After Monday's A-level grading U-turn, education unions and Labour had demanded to know why BTEC students had missed out.

Pearson said it had 'generally' accepted teachers' predictions for coursework. But it had calculated exam grades using historical performance data with a 'view of maintaining overall outcomes over time'.

The review will 'remove these calculated grades'. The regrading will apply to BTEC level 3 nationals, BTEC level 1/2 tech awards, level 2 technicals and level 1/2 firsts.

About 450,000 pupils are affected, 250,000 of whom will have already received grades last week.

In a letter to colleges, Pearson said it had 'become concerned about unfairness in relation to what are now significantly higher outcomes for GCSE and A-levels'. It added: 'We appreciate this will cause additional uncertainty for students and we are sorry'.

Ofqual said: 'Everyone is working as quickly as possible to confirm results as soon as possible, recognising the impact that delays are having on schools, colleges and students.'

Meanwhile Government sources have indicated that Boris Johnson will not sack the Education Secretary, or demote him in a major reshuffle.

But senior backers have privately told the Whip Office that Mr Williamson should be fired after the exams fiasco.

It came when Mr. Johnson's leadership fell to its lowest level since he was appointed Prime Minister.

A YouGov poll for The Times found that support for the Conservatives fell four points to 40 percent, while Labor rose three points to 38 percent in one week.

Tory MPs have warned that a failure to get all students back to school next month would be the "last straw" for Williamson.

A senior Tory said: "Gavin's position is completely untenable and we need a strong lead in September that he is singularly incapable of."

Mr Williamson was also forced to bow to Ofqual's pressure and back for the first time after he was accused of playing a guilt game.

He admitted that it was the regulator's decision to abandon the grades set by an algorithm and move on to teacher reviews.

A student reacts after reading her GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

A student reacts after reading her GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

Students react as they check their GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

Students react as they check their GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

A student checks her GCSE results this morning at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire

A student checks her GCSE results this morning at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax, West Yorkshire

Students react as they check their GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

Students react as they check their GCSE results at Ark Academy in London this morning

A student reacts as she checks her GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

A student reacts as she checks her GCSE results at Crossley Heath Grammar School in Halifax this morning

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react this morning as they receive their GCSE results

Students at Bristnall Hall Academy in Oldbury in the West Midlands react this morning as they receive their GCSE results

The Ministry of Education said, “The decision (Ofqual) to switch from moderated grades to centered grades was one that we agreed to. Our focus remains on working with Ofqual to ensure that students receive their final GCSE, AS and A-Level scores this week so they can move on to the next phase of their lives. & # 39;

GCSE and A-level exams next summer should be overhauled with some topics made 'optional', demands teaching union

GCSE and A-Level exams next summer should be revised with some subjects that have been deemed "optional," a teachers' union said yesterday.

The National Education Union called for "reduced content" on test papers to help teachers manage the effects of further virus outbreaks.

And it required less trust in the papers at the end of the year – because they make the students "anxious".

The joint general secretaries Dr. Mary Bousted and Kevin Courtney made the demands in a letter to Education Secretary Gavin Williamson.

They called for a "thorough, independent review of the assessment methods for awarding GCSE and A-level qualifications in England".

Her letter goes on to say, "The current over-reliance on exams at the end of the course increases student anxiety."

The approval will raise further questions about whether Mr. Williamson was unaware of the extent of the problem or how the controversial algorithm would even work by the weekend.

Tory MPs have told the Whip Office that Mr Williamson should now leave his post.

Defense Committee chairman Tobias Ellwood said the government should "reconfigure" its top team and leverage "full talent." And a former minister said, “There is real anger now about how someone like Gavin got (the job) in the first place.

There are questions of verdict as to why Theresa May and then Boris Johnson promoted him. Someone with more competence in the same job could have avoided all of this. & # 39;

In Northern Ireland, teacher-assessed GCSE results have seen an improvement across all grades.

Some 29,000 students in Northern Ireland received results this morning from the locally-based examinations body CCEA. Some 37.1 per cent of students achieved grade A* to A, up by 5.7 percentage points on last year.

The proportion of students receiving A* to C grades also increased, by 7.6 percentage points to 89.4 per cent. And the numbers receiving A* – G grades increased by 0.9 percentage points to 99.7 per cent.

Stormont education minister Peter Weir issued a statement congratulating GCSE students. 'These outcomes reflect the assessments made by the people who know you best, your teachers,' he said.

'I appreciate the past few months have been particularly challenging but our young people have demonstrated a determination not to let this pandemic put their lives on hold. Today, they have been awarded qualifications which reflect their hard work and will enable them to move forward confidently with their future plans.

'Teachers and school leaders had a very difficult job to do and I want to express my appreciation for their hard work and commitment to their students in challenging circumstances.'

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