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A man investigating the 1947 Roswell crash found indestructible debris that was not made by human hands.


It was the summer of 1947, the US was in the middle of the Cold War, scientists were about to discover plutonium, and Grand Central Station in New York hit a record 252,288 passengers, but the most memorable event could be the Roswell crash.

The front page story of the local newspaper reported that the Roswell Army field found a flying saucer on a New Mexico ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the country.

"The 509th Bombardment Group's Intelligence Bureau at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today that the field had acquired a flying saucer," Roswell Daily Record reported on July 8, 1947.

The statement was made by Jesse Marcel Sr., who was the first to arrive and lead the investigation that found it was part of an alien vehicle.

Shortly after the UFO discovery hit the headlines, the Washington Department of War issued a statement claiming the debris was the remains of a weather balloon.

The U.S. Air Force said the weather balloon was part of Project Mogul, which tested a flight system invented by Columbia University, New York University, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution that scanned the atmosphere for faint reverberations from nuclear tests for other countries.

Marcel died on June 24, 1986, but his story lives on with grandchildren Jess Marcel III and John Marcel, who told DailyMail.com that their grandfather never wavered or changed details of what he saw that day.

"He was made a fall man," Jesse said, claiming his grandfather was "ordered" to deny what was really at the crash site.

"He was the chief of intelligence in Roswell, New Mexico, and he followed orders."

"In essence, he was at the heart of the story and the conspiracy or cover-up."

The only physical evidence of this riddle is Marcel Sr.'s diary, which appeared during the History Channel's three-part series "Roswell: The First Witness," which airs on Saturday December 12th, relating to the investigation with the Marcel Sr. Children follows, is to be revealed and host and former CIA agent Ben Smith.

The front page story of the local newspaper reported that the Roswell Army field found a flying saucer on a New Mexico ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the country. "The 509th Bombardment Group's Intelligence Bureau at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today that the field had acquired a flying saucer," Roswell Daily Record reported on July 8, 1947

"The interesting thing is that the diary has moved from grandfather's hands to our father's hands and now ours," Jesse said.

"There's a lot of forays inside that don't really fit who our grandfather was."

Smith saw the diary himself, which shows a change in Marcel Sr.'s mental state.

"There are pauses in the diary that are not clear, but it could be a secret code," he claimed.

The statement was made by Jesse Marcel Sr. (pictured), who was the first to arrive and lead the investigation that found it was part of an alien vehicle.

The statement was made by Jesse Marcel Sr. (pictured), who was the first to arrive and lead the investigation that found it was part of an alien vehicle.

Pictured is Jesse Marcel III

John Marcel is pictured

Marcel has since died, but his story lives on with his grandchildren Jess Marcel III (left) and John Marcel (right) who told DailyMail.com that their grandfather never wavered or changed details of what he saw that day Has

“I came with a neutral reason. I wanted to find the truth out of fiction and portray the knowledge and the unknown, ”explained Smith.

"If I hadn't thought that the story wasn't going to contain more, I wouldn't have taken on the project."

Smith said the investigation lasted more than a year as he and the Marcel children spoke to the close contacts of Marcel Sr, and then survived family members of Roswell residents who first reported the wreck to authorities.

Scientific methods were also used to investigate the crash site. Smith used multispectral imaging technology to identify foreign objects based on their chemical composition.

"I'm not convinced it's a balloon," said Smith. "But I'm still waiting to make my decision."

"Jesse did his duty to keep the advertising line."

The only physical evidence of this riddle is Marcel Sr.'s diary, due to be unveiled on Saturday December 12th during a history channel series pointing to the investigation with the Marcel children and the host and former CIA agent Ben Smith follows. Pictured is a shot of the crew working on the wreck for the History Channel show

The only physical evidence of this riddle is Marcel Sr.'s diary, due to be unveiled on Saturday December 12th during a history channel series pointing to the investigation with the Marcel children and the host and former CIA agent Ben Smith follows. Pictured is a shot of the crew working on the wreck for the History Channel show

Marcel was called in to do a thorough examination of the rubble. Marcel, who played a key role in the dropping of the atomic bomb on Japan, completed the training with weather balloons and Jesse said it was "absurd" to see one in the field and not identify it.

Marcel was called in to do a thorough examination of the rubble. Marcel, who played a key role in the dropping of the atomic bomb on Japan, completed the training with weather balloons and Jesse said it was "absurd" to see one in the field and not identify it.

"He was an intelligent, able officer who knew the value and importance of secrets."

Secret of the 1947 Roswell Wreck

In July 1947, a rancher reported debris scattered across his land.

The authorities were called to the scene and after examining the rubble, it was found that the pieces came from a flying sauce.

The front page story of the local newspaper reported that the Roswell Army field found a flying saucer on a New Mexico ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the country.

"The 509th Bombardment Group's Intelligence Bureau at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today that the field had acquired a flying saucer," Roswell Daily Record reported on July 8, 1947.

Shortly after the UFO discovery hit the headlines, the Washington Department of War issued a statement claiming the debris was the remains of a weather balloon.

"Why did he make statements and hold them for so long?"

& # 39; They didn't grow, they stayed the same. It was the same simple story. & # 39;

The wreck was first discovered by W.W. & # 39; Mac & # 39; Brazel, who took his sheep to a nearby stream.

Brazel's eyewitness account states that he and his friend Will Proctor "discovered strange bits of metal and debris scattered all over the Foster Ranch."

"They found strange pieces of film that couldn't be cut, burned, or wrinkled, and thin 'I-rays with strange symbols," the document says.

"The rubble was in the middle of nowhere," said Jess.

"The way they found it was a flock of sheep that refused to cross the field of matter to get to a source of water."

"Even animals had a sense of what it was and didn't want to avoid it."

Upon discovery, Marcel was taken for a thorough examination of the rubble.

Marcel, who played a key role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, was trained with weather balloons, and Jesse said it was "absurd" to see one in the field and not be able to identify it.

"He had examined the debris in the field and found that it was not man-made," he continued.

Marcel was a smoker at the time and pulled a lighter out of his pocket to melt or heat the metal – neither according to his diary, his grandchildren said.

He collected the debris from the construction site and brought it back to the base, where they tried to determine what the parts came from and what type of material they were made of.

According to Jesse and John, immediately after reaching the base, Marcel grabbed a drill and tried to drill a hole through the base, but said the blades broke on impact.

Marcel described the pieces exposed on the rubble to his grandchildren as being covered in oil, some were bars with what he called "extraterrestrial writing" and the rubble appeared to be pieces of metal and plastic, along with miles of fiberglass.

"He said there was fiber and fiber that might be coming from the computers on the ship," John said.

Marcel found that the debris couldn't melt or heat up and couldn't be pierced - even with a drill. He described the parts as being covered in oil, some were bars with strange writing, and the debris appeared to be metal and plastic pieces, along with miles of fiberglass

Marcel found that the debris couldn't melt or heat up and couldn't be pierced – even with a drill. He described the parts as being covered in oil, some were bars with strange writing, and the debris appeared to be metal and plastic pieces, along with miles of fiberglass

"When my grandfather came home with the rubble, our father looked through it with shining light and saw a purple light inside with a symbolic seal that balanced a ball on his nose."

Jesse agreed that her father motioned for her grandfather to take a look.

"My grandfather said, 'You could be the first person on Earth to do alien writing," Jesse said.

"It probably tells you how to use the on-board toilet."

However, the Air Force's report of the event said the debris was pieces of metal balloons, sensors, and radar reflectors from Project Mogal – which may have played a role in the weighting of spaceship theory.

And the team's work in New Mexico has done numerous balloon flights.

"The relatively simple description of sticks, paper, tape and aluminum foil has since evolved into exotic metals with hieroglyphics and fiber optic materials," the Air Force report said.

The Air Force's report of the event said the debris was parts of metal balloons, sensors and radar reflectors from Project Mogal - which may have helped give weight to spaceship theory. And the team's work in New Mexico has done numerous balloon flights. Marcel is pictured with the rubble

The Air Force's report of the event said the debris was pieces of metal from Project Mogal's balloons, sensors, and radar reflectors – which may have helped give weight to spaceship theory. And the team's work in New Mexico has done numerous balloon flights. Marcel is pictured with the rubble

"Alien alien bodies have allegedly been found."

Although Marcel Sr. said he did not see any living being at the Roswell site, he claimed that there were multiple crash sites at around the same time that other investigators said they saw or were once alive.

“The big thing about our grandfather is that it put a lot of pressure on him,” Jesse said.

“I can't believe he was the downer. He felt like the right person, in the right place at the right time, and he was very lucky to be that guy – even after all the pressure. & # 39;

"He was ahead of WWII bomb programming intelligence, so he knew how to keep secrets safe, and he was someone they picked to see the wreckage and come forward, which says a lot."

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