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A debt firm employee stole £ 380,000 to quench his gambling addiction after the bookies offered him free bets


A debt firm employee stole £ 380,000 from employers to quench his gambling addiction after bookies offered him free bets and hospitality at races in Cheltenham

  • Glyn Rothwell, 36, stole money from the Harrington Brooks debt-management firm
  • He used ignorant colleagues to "approve" payments that went into his account
  • Investigations revealed that 343 fraudulent transactions took place between 2015 and 2019
  • He admitted position abuse fraud and was jailed for three years

A finance clerk stole money to foster a spiraling gambling habit after becoming addicted when bookies offered him free bets and days off for race meetings.

36-year-old Glyn Rothwell stole £ 380,000 after claiming betting companies put cash into his account and gave him free hospitality at the Cheltenham Races.

He said he got caught in a "debt vortex" after the bookies encouraged him to place more bets.

Over a four-year period, Rothwell, who worked as an account manager for the debt management firm Harrington Brooks, stole money from the company's accounts.

36-year-old Glyn Rothwell stole £ 380,000 from Harrington Brooks' debt firm after getting caught up in a "debt vortex" claiming bookmakers encouraged him to place more bets

He used ignorant coworkers and even roommates with whom he worked to "approve" payments which then went to his own account.

Rothwell, from Sale near Altrincham, was a Client Account Supervisor and was tasked with returning loan payments to the correct recipients.

The scam was discovered when Harrington Brooks was acquired by the digital bank Think Money and an audit found officials found there was a lack of money.

Investigations revealed 343 fraudulent transactions between 2015 and 2019.

Rothwell even stole £ 92,000 while serving three months' notice after submitting his resignation before the thefts were exposed.

At Minshull Street Crown Court in Manchester, Rothwell admitted positional abuse and was sentenced to three years in prison.

Prosecutor Justin Hayhoe said, “He built a relationship by living with such a person and he became friends with them and they trusted what he said.

& # 39; He diverted the money from the company to his personal account. In total, his amount of money was just under £ 382,000.

He claimed betting firms deposited cash into his account and offered him free hospitality at the Cheltenham Races pictured

He claimed betting firms deposited cash into his account and offered him free hospitality at the Cheltenham Races pictured

He added: “The company investigation cost £ 38,400 and they have refunded all the money to the rightful people.

A total of £ 420,378.63 had to be paid due to the fraud.

"He admitted that he had taken money, acted alone, and was under no pressure. He did so because of a gambling debt and a drug addiction to cocaine."

Damage Control Defender Sarah Magill said: “It is rooted in a long and ingrained gambling and drug addiction that is spiraling out of control.

"Bookmakers would put money into his account and trick him into losing more money by offering hospitality like days at Cheltenham Races to encourage him to keep playing."

Rothwell, from Sale near Altrincham, was a Client Account Supervisor and was tasked with returning loan payments to the correct recipients

Rothwell, from Sale near Altrincham, was a Client Account Supervisor and was tasked with returning loan payments to the correct recipients

She added, "It explains how a man can take huge sums of money from an employer and only receive a prison sentence."

Judge sentencing John Edwards said to Rothwell, “I accept that you have found yourself in a vortex of debt, gambling and class A drugs that began when your life was at a low tide.

“However, this was a tremendous amount of money that you took and it would have taken a long time to investigate.

"Fraud in this class, and how you are imbued with that level of trust, must be characterized by custody."

Rothwell will be the subject of a crime proceeds hearing at a later date.

At Minshull Street Crown Court in Manchester, Rothwell admitted positional abuse and was sentenced to three years in prison

At Minshull Street Crown Court in Manchester, Rothwell admitted positional abuse and was sentenced to three years in prison

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