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London is ready to lead the nation out of prison with a European "coffee culture".


London is ready to upset the nation with a European "coffee culture" as its crucial R rate shows that it is the healthiest in England

  • Downing Street confirmed that London could be the first country to get out of the blockade
  • Ministers created the city transition board to coordinate easing restrictions
  • The board is led jointly by the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan and the MP Robert Jenrick

London could lead the country out of the blockade. There will be talks next week about opening the capital's cafes and restaurants to the outside.

Ministers set up a transitional authority for the city yesterday to coordinate efforts to lift the restrictions. The body is the first of its kind in the country.

Downing Street confirmed last night that London could pull out of the block first. When asked if the measures could be eased before the rest of the country, the Prime Minister's official spokesman said: "Since we are able to collect more data and better monitor the infection rate in different parts of the country, we will." In some parts of the country, measures may be canceled faster than in others. We can also apply the brakes in some parts of the country. "

Discussions will be held next week to discuss whether London's cafes and restaurants can open up outdoor services such as the Greenwich Tavern in Greenwich, London

An almost deserted Trafalgar Square in central London, as Downing Street admitted today, the capital could be released earlier if interest rates continued to fall

An almost deserted Trafalgar Square in central London, as Downing Street admitted today, the capital could be released earlier if interest rates continued to fall

Parks like Hyde Park in London are already filling up, but the majority of Londoners work from home - and many don't work at all

Parks like Hyde Park in London are already filling up, but the majority of Londoners work from home – and many don't work at all

A Whitehall source said talks would be held next week to discuss the possible relaxation of outdoor hospitality regulations.

They added that given the evidence that the virus is much less widespread outdoors, ministers hoped to promote a European “coffee culture” in London and other cities.

London was the epicenter of the March and April epidemic, but cases have declined rapidly. There were no new cases in the capital during a 24-hour period this week.

According to estimates by the University of Cambridge and Public Health England, the so-called R rate, which measures the rate of spread of the virus, is approximately half that of the rest of the country.

The number of new cases diagnosed in all regions of England decreased in May. London now reports fewer than 100 a day for a fortnight. The numbers for the past few days will increase significantly in the coming days as further test results are confirmed

The number of new cases diagnosed in all regions of England decreased in May. London now reports fewer than 100 a day for a fortnight. The numbers for the past few days will increase significantly in the coming days as further test results are confirmed

HOW DID LONDON'S DAILY CASE COUNT?

May 6: 151

May 7: 149

May 8: 94

May 9: 63

May 10: 36

May 11: 68

May 12: 73

May 13: 82

May 14: 81

May 15: 52

May 16: 23

May 17: 23

May 18: 14

May 19: 2

Numbers in bold can change significantly as more test results are confirmed.

A national estimate of yesterday's R-rate put it at 0.7 and the critical number at one, but further loosening of restrictions by scientists was rejected. But the number is said to be lower in the wider community outside of hospitals and nursing homes, with a Whitehall source telling the mail that it was estimated at 0.5.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said he was "very careful" about easing restrictions in the capital.

But after yesterday's plans for a London Transition Board, the mayor will lose his veto over measures in the city. The new body will be led jointly by Mr. Khan and the local secretary Robert Jenrick, which will allow the government to play a direct role in the re-movement of London.

In a joint statement yesterday, the two men said the work program needed to get capital back on line was "the largest since the end of World War II."

The panel will focus on a number of key issues, including infection control, restoration of key public services such as traffic, and plans that vary in the scope of restrictions.

Mr. Jenrick spoke about the prospect of getting London moving last night and said: & # 39; With this new transition board, we will carefully build on the extensive plans already underway to make life and business in London – the most dynamic capital in the world – get going. certainly on the right track again. & # 39;

Mr Khan was more cautious and said: "The economic, health and social challenges that arise from both the virus itself and the blockade are far-reaching, and the recovery of London will be a long and complex one, many months if will not take years. & # 39;

Documents released by the government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency show that ministers are considering blocking London until March before deciding on a national approach.

However, the government's road map to easing the blockade leaves the door open to lift restrictions in some areas from others.

Almost one in five people in London already had CORONAVIRUS

Almost one in five in London – 17 percent – already had the corona virus, according to surveillance tests, which means that around 1.53 million people have been infected and recovered from the virus.

Health Minister Matt Hancock announced that tests on antibodies in a sample of the population will give the government initial clues as to how many people have already contracted the disease.

Meanwhile, the rate in the rest of the UK seemed to be around five percent, which would be 2.85 million people.

This indicates that the mortality rate in London, at around 0.62 percent, is significantly lower than in the rest of the United Kingdom, where it appears to be closer to 1.39 percent.

An expert suggested that this could be because the average age of people in London is younger and COVID-19 is known to be fatal to the elderly. And they claimed the price of land could mean that there have been fewer nursing homes devastated by the corona virus since the March crisis got out of control.

The data is based on 1,000 tests that Public Health England conducted in late April and early May as part of its ongoing surveillance survey.

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