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Coronaphobia captures the nation: The British fear that the blockade will be loosened too quickly


The British don't want to work again because they fear the lock will be loosened too quickly – and they enjoy being at home, a poll showed last night.

The survey was a setback for Boris Johnson and highlighted his difficult task of quickly reviving the country's dying economy.

It was found that people have more money in their pockets on average than when the blockade began – with public sector workers benefiting the most.

Millions of voters are putting their feet up at home – and an astonishing four in ten have increased, which is particularly worrying after there is clear evidence of a link between obesity and coronavirus.

JL Partners' Daily Mail poll shows the heroic status of doctors, nurses, and other NHS workers at the forefront with almost 100 percent approval.

However, there is a big difference between the impact of the lock on people with jobs in the private sector and the 5.5 million in the public sector.

A total of 38 percent of those employed in the private sector, in which tens of thousands lost their jobs or cut wages, are worse off, according to the survey. Only 29 percent are better off.

The survey was a setback for Boris Johnson and highlighted his difficult task of quickly reviving the country's dying economy

The survey was a setback for Boris Johnson and highlighted his difficult task of quickly reviving the country's dying economy

In contrast, 46 percent of public sector workers are doing better, 30 percent say it made no difference, and only 23 percent, less than one in four, are worse off.

This means that a total of 76 percent – more than three quarters – of public sector workers are either not worse or better off.

Overall, the public says they are 4 percent better off. The poll will ring alarm bells at Downing Street, where it has already been feared that many people are unwilling to go back to work to save the economy – a view seen by crowded beaches and parks in sunny weather last week is reinforced.

People are aware of how badly the economy has been hit. Four in ten say it will take at least three years to recover.

But the survey also confirms that they don't like to work – marriages have improved and there is more support for reopening pubs and restaurants than bringing kids back to the classroom from June.

The poll will also fuel Tory MPs' concern that Chancellor Rishi Sunak's billion-dollar pandemic rescue package – including paying up to 80 percent vacation days to layoffs by October – could be too generous.

It has made Mr. Sunak, known by critics as "Mr. Magic Money Tree", by far the most popular politician in Britain. It even receives an unprecedented 13 percent rating from Labor voters, a large part of whom work in the public sector.

In other developments:

  • It turned out that London could show the way out of the block, with talks next week about opening cafes and restaurants for outdoor service.
  • An exclusive mail poll found that employees don't want to go back to work because they fear the lock will be loosened too quickly.
  • Health officials suggested that the two-meter rule could be relaxed;
  • There was a dispute over the official advice from government scientists to reopen schools.
  • The country's leading obesity and diabetes doctor said families were likely to have gained weight when blocked.
  • Official figures showed government bonds hit £ 62bn last month – almost as much as last year;
  • Scientists responded to the official response to the pandemic, suggesting that the delay in the blockade could have taken lives.
  • Council leaders and police forces took drastic measures to keep vacationers away from beauty spots during the bank holiday.
  • The head of the NHS proposed filling thousands of jobs by retraining employees from difficult industries such as airlines.
  • The test tsar said that thousands of kits that were sent home were not returned.
It has been referred to by critics as "Mr. Magic Money Tree", whom Mr. Sunak, who was mentioned above for clapping for carers, is by far the most popular politician in Great Britain. It even receives an unprecedented 13 percent rating from Labor voters, a large part of whom work in the public sector

It has been referred to by critics as "Mr. Magic Money Tree", whom Mr. Sunak, who was mentioned above for clapping for carers, is by far the most popular politician in Great Britain. It even receives an unprecedented 13 percent rating from Labor voters, a large part of whom work in the public sector

A total of 35 percent of OAPs say they have more money, 53 percent say it made no difference, and only 12 percent are worse off.

43 percent of all voters say they enjoyed being at home more, only 25 percent don't enjoy it.

A total of 53 percent say the lock is already being released too quickly, while 11 percent insist that it is too slow.

2m can be loosened as a rule

The two-meter rule could be reduced in the near future, officials said yesterday.

Public Health England said the advice to stand 6 feet 6 inches from others has been reviewed frequently.

The rule is one of the strictest in the world, with most countries insisting on 1.5 m or less.

Pubs and restaurants managers say that two meters makes many companies unprofitable. Professor Yvonne Doyle of PHE said: "We are aware of the international differences and I am sure that this will be the subject of further research into whether this can be further reduced."

From June 1, anyone who is informed that they may be a virus carrier must isolate for 14 days as part of the "Test and Trace" scheme.

However, Tory voters are keen to get back to normal – 45 percent of Conservatives say the pace of easing the lock is “about right”, another 10 percent say it is “too slow”.

Few British believe that the economy will recover quickly. Only 6 percent say it will be revived in twelve months – 41 percent say it will take at least three years.

Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson has still stopped working to convince parents that schools should reopen in June.

Only 26 percent of primary school parents say they will send their children to school in early June – 60 percent say they will refuse.

A total of 55 percent support unions' offer to prevent schools from returning in early June, while 27 percent say unions have no right to do so. Conservative voters also take a tougher stance on unions. 48 percent of the Tories say that they must not veto the return to school.

When asked what should be opened soon, cafes, pubs and shops are put in front of the schools.

The survey also shows how the blockage affected family life.

22 percent say they get on better with their spouses, while 9 percent say that relationships have deteriorated. However, 17 percent state that their love life has deteriorated, only 13 percent state that it has improved. Twenty-one percent of parents say that their relationship with their children has improved, and six percent say that it has worsened.

Obviously not everyone works with Joe Wicks, 41 percent are getting fatter. Only 16 percent are slimmer. Weight gain is most pronounced in women.

The survey shows that up to half of us may have violated blackout rules. A total of 43 percent said they had not violated any of the rules. The government receives recognition from 63 percent of voters for preventing the NHS from being overwhelmed.

But 66 percent say that residents of nursing homes were not protected. Despite the criticism, Sir Keir's attacks on the prime minister because of the crisis have won him few fans. A total of 42 percent say Mr. Johnson is doing a better job, while 27 percent say Starmer wins.

Mr. Sunak received 37 percent in a cabinet popularity test, Foreign Minister Dominic Raab received second with 8 percent, followed by Mr. Johnson with plus 5 percent.

Even Labor voters give Dishy Rishi a 13 percent rating.

JL Partners interviewed 2,053 people in the UK online between Wednesday and yesterday.

London could initially be blocked because cafes and restaurants are to be opened to the outside according to the plans discussed by the ministers

By Jason Groves, political editor for the Daily Mail

London could lead the country out of the coronavirus blockage. The next week, there will be talk of whether the capital’s cafes and restaurants can be opened for outdoor service.

Ministers yesterday set up a new transition board for the capital to coordinate efforts to lift the restrictions. The body is the first of its kind in the country.

And Downing Street confirmed that London could get out of the lockdown first.

Ministers yesterday set up a new transition board for the capital to coordinate efforts to lift the restrictions. A worker disinfects a subway train in the capital

Ministers yesterday set up a new transition board for the capital to coordinate efforts to lift the restrictions. A worker disinfects a subway train in the capital

When asked whether measures could be eased in the capital before the rest of the country, the Prime Minister's official spokesman said: "As we are able to collect more data and better monitor the infection rate in different parts of the country, we will." in some parts of the country we may be able to lift measures faster than in others. We can also apply the brakes in some parts of the country. "

A Whitehall source said talks would be held next week to discuss the possible relaxation of outdoor hospitality regulations.

They added that given the evidence that the virus is much less widespread outdoors, ministers hoped to promote a European “coffee culture” in London and other cities.

London was the epicenter of the March and April epidemic, but cases have declined rapidly. There were no new cases in the capital during a 24-hour period this week.

According to estimates by the University of Cambridge and Public Health England, the so-called R rate, which measures the rate of spread of the virus, is approximately half that of the rest of the country.

A national estimate of yesterday's R-rate put it at 0.7 and the critical number at one, but further loosening of restrictions by scientists was rejected. However, the number is said to be lower in the wider community outside of hospitals and nursing homes. A source from Whitehall tells the mail that it is estimated to be 0.5.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said he was "very careful" about easing restrictions in the capital.

According to yesterday's plans for a London Transition Board, the mayor will lose his veto over measures in the capital. The new body will be led jointly by Mr. Khan and the local secretary Robert Jenrick, which will allow the government to play a direct role in the re-movement of London.

In a joint statement yesterday, the two men said the work program needed to get capital back on line was "the largest since the end of World War II."

The new body will focus on a number of key issues, including infection control, restoration of key public services such as traffic, and plans that vary in scale of restrictions.

Mr. Jenrick spoke last night about the prospect of getting London moving and said: & # 39; With this new transition board, we will carefully build on the extensive plans already underway to make life and business in London – the most dynamic capital in the world – to enable. certainly on the right track again. & # 39;

Mr Khan was more cautious and said: "The economic, health and social challenges that arise from both the virus itself and the blockade are far-reaching, and the recovery of London will be a long and complex one, many months if will not take years. & # 39;

Documents released by the government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency show that ministers are considering blocking London until March before deciding on a national approach.

However, the government's road map to easing the blockade leaves the door open to lift restrictions in some areas from others.

Employers will have to pay a quarter of vacationing workers' wages from August, as Rishi Sunak is handling the £ 80bn program due to the relaxation of the ban

By Jemma Carr for MailOnline

As of August, employers will have to pay 25 percent of the wages of their employees on leave, as announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

Mr Sunak last week extended the government's coronavirus vacation program, which the government covers 80 percent of workers' wages up to a limit of £ 2,500 per month. However, companies have to cover part of the wages.

As part of the plans, which are expected to be announced next week, all companies in the program will be told to pay a quarter of their employees' wages even if they remain closed, The Times reports.

As of August, employers will have to pay 25 percent of the wages of their employees on leave, as announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak

As of August, employers will have to pay 25 percent of the wages of their employees on leave, as announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak

Companies may also return part-time workers on leave with the number of hours chosen per week by the employee.

While the government continues to pay pension contributions, companies have to pay social security.

What happens to the vacation program?

The multi-billion pound vacation program will be extended until October.

The system's employees continue to receive 80 percent of wages up to a limit of £ 2,500 per month.

No changes to the system will be made until the end of July.

From August to October there will be "more flexibility" so that employees on leave can work part-time again.

From then on, companies are expected to share the cost of paying their salaries. This means that some who remain largely closed will have to decide whether to fire them.

Further details of the agreements will be announced by the end of the month.

The total cost of the vacation program could be £ 80bn, warns the Budgetary Service, and more than eight million people have been given leave.

The bosses have already warned that if employers are asked to share the cost of the vacation program, there will be massive job losses.

Industry experts also claim that Chancellor Rishi Sunak's expansion of the Job Retention Scheme (JRS), in which the Treasury funds 80 percent of wages, only delays layoffs.

Mr Sunak's announcement that the program would be extended until October, but the companies would start sharing the financial burden with the Treasury, raised alarm bells that rang across the UK Plc and called for assurances for companies in "emergencies" that did not The wages of their employees on leave were once able to manage a fraction of it.

Small businesses that have had no income since the crisis are particularly nervous about how they can afford to pay.

Jay Lee, director of the online learning company uAcademy, which employs 14 vacationers, initially described the JRS as a "stroke of luck".

But he told MailOnline: & # 39; The government's recent announcement to share the cost of the vacation program would be a major blow to us as we cannot cover part of the wages. This is simply because the company has no revenue and it is essentially closed. & # 39;

Executives faced with bleak balance sheets will face difficult decisions if the changes to the JRS occur in a few months.

Ian Girling, managing director of the Dorset Chamber of Commerce, believes that companies "need to examine staff costs in an undoubtedly challenging environment."

It is feared that the retail sector, where sales will plummet due to the closure of stores, will "inevitably" have fewer branch employees (Oxford Street in London pictured).

It is feared that the retail sector, where sales will plummet due to the closure of stores, will "inevitably" have fewer branch employees (Oxford Street in London pictured).

He added: "Many companies will have to restructure with the future in mind, and layoffs will be inevitable and unfortunately."

Representatives of the sectors most affected by the blockade have raised concerns that the Chancellor's multi-billion dollar bailout will not go far enough.

It is feared that the retail sector, in which sales have plunged after the store closes, will "inevitably" have fewer store employees in the future.

Richard Lim, Managing Director of Retail Economics, told MailOnline: & # 39; There are no two ways, there will be fewer jobs in the retail sector if we get out of this crisis.

& # 39; There will still be administrations. Government support measures provide a lifeline to keep businesses alive, save cash, continue to operate, and enable working capital to do so.

He added, "For some companies, some employees will be on vacation who they will find unlikely to return to the same roles as before if they have these roles."

Mr. Lim added that retailers would likely shift more weight behind online sales and would "absolutely try" to keep shop staff if possible, but this could mean fewer hours or job sharing.

The picture in the travel sector looks just as bleak, as the summer holidays abroad are almost canceled for the British.

Airlines have been forced to lay off thousands of workers as countries around the world force flight stops to curb the spread of the virus.

IAG, the parent company of British Airways, said that the Chancellor's expansion of vacation financing will not make up for the enormous loss of revenue in the long term.

A statement to MailOnline said: "We welcome the Chancellor's decision to extend the job retention system and, as Willie Walsh said yesterday in the Transport Select Committee, welcome his swift action to deal with this crisis.

“While this is a welcome relief, it is not a permanent financial solution.

"We only have a few additional days to go through the restructuring that our company will need to get through this unprecedented crisis."

The immediate future of the hospitality industry also remains uncertain, with warnings that pubs and restaurants may remain closed for many months.

It is feared that bosses without a source of income and high overheads will not be able to pay half the wages of their employees on leave.

Patrick Langmaid, who owns the Mother Ivey & # 39; s Bay holiday park in Padstow, predicts a hard job cut.

"We are very concerned about how we as an employer will contribute through August, September and October," he told the BBC.

"I have already started to inform my team that there must be layoffs."

Kate Nicholls, executive director of UKHospitality, who represents the industry, welcomed the extension of the program, but warned: “The full 80 percent may need to be extended after July for some companies in sectors such as the hospitality industry that are still operating at a much reduced level will be trading or not yet able to open. & # 39;

The Chancellor was also warned that expanding the system and emptying the public sector will actually increase the likelihood of layoffs in the long run.

Professor Len Shackleton of the Institute of Economic Affairs said: "The longer companies depend on the vacation program and are unable to reorganize employees and adapt their business models, the less likely it is that people will have jobs again after the ban.

"It will also delay individuals' plans to find other jobs where it will clearly be necessary."

However, he suggested that company executives are under pressure to keep employees on vacation instead of firing them now because they should reject government funding.

He told MailOnline: "They would certainly be criticized by employees and unions for firing employees and forcing universal loans if the government offered more money for the job retention scheme."

The Institute of Directors said: “We now need more clarity on employer contributions. Many companies that are normally on a solid foundation are still in an emergency. & # 39;

Edwin Morgan, Director of Policy, added: “Companies do not want to rely on government support as much as they do now, but the response to coronavirus has brought much of the economy to a standstill.

"It is important that the government make changes to support programs with care, as their execution will inevitably force companies to make difficult decisions about whether to employ people if demand has not returned."

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