TECHNOLOGY

Volunteers put on suits worn by "Money Heist" actors to reach the homeless in Mexico City


Volunteers target the homeless population of Mexico City at risk of coronavirus infection while putting on suits like Money Heist actors

  • The El Caracol Civil Association contacts homeless people in Mexico City and provides face masks and hand sanitizers during the coronavirus pandemic
  • The organization has equipped its employees with non-contact electronic thermometers to record body temperatures
  • The Mexican capital has 16 districts with 9 million inhabitants and almost 7,000 are homeless
  • On Friday, Mexican City reported 1,754 deaths and 16,758 confirmed cases of coronavirus
  • The country has registered a total of 6,510 deaths from the virus and a total of 59,567 people have been infected
  • Up to 4,577 people died from breathing problems between March 18, the date of their first death with COVID-19 in Mexico, and May 12
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19

The Professor of & # 39; Money Heist & # 39; would certainly approve of the good deed that a Mexico City-based nonprofit has done since the spread of the coronavirus pandemic in the Mexican capital.

As the virus spread to Asia and Europe, El Caracol Civil Association founder and director Luis Enrique Hernández began developing a plan to help the forgotten homeless population in Mexico City.

At least six members of the community organization made their way to the 16 districts of Mexico City and searched for the estimated 4,300 federal district homeless people at risk of getting COVID-19. Another 2,400 live in emergency shelters.

The small group's volunteers did so while putting on PSA suits similar to those of the characters in the successful Netflix series, although this was not their express intention. They just wanted a suit that would protect them from infections and make them recognizable in the homeless community.

The El Caracol Civil Association visits Mexico's 16 districts in search of homeless people and helps to slow the outbreak of the coronavirus in the Mexican capital

A volunteer measures a child's temperature with a non-contact electronic thermometer

A volunteer measures a child's temperature with a non-contact electronic thermometer

El Caracol is made up of six volunteers, including its founder, who are targeting Mexico's homeless population during the coronavirus pandemic. Since March 28, the nonprofit group has distributed 1,400 kits that include face masks, soap, and hand sanitizers

El Caracol is made up of six volunteers, including its founder, who are targeting Mexico's homeless population during the coronavirus pandemic. Since March 28, the nonprofit group has distributed 1,400 kits that include face masks, soap, and hand sanitizers

Led by Hernández, the group underwent medical training, attended workshops to learn more about the global epidemic and how to identify potential cases, and received symptom information.

Since March 26, El Caracol has met 800 people to whom it could offer support and awareness.

So far, 1,400 kits with face masks, soap and hand disinfectants have been distributed.

The staff is also equipped with a non-contact electronic thermometer that can register temperatures for members of a population who have not been informed of the dangers of the pandemic.

The body temperature of an adult homeless person is measured in Mexico City. Mexico's capital was hardest hit with COVID-19. 1,754 people died and 16,758 confirmed cases

The body temperature of an adult homeless person is measured in Mexico City. Mexico's capital was hardest hit with COVID-19. 1,754 people died and 16,758 confirmed cases

El Caracol's director and founder, Luis Enrique Hernández, is providing water to a homeless person in Mexico City to slow the spread of COVID-19

El Caracol's director and founder, Luis Enrique Hernández, is providing water to a homeless person in Mexico City to slow the spread of COVID-19

“It was very important because it gave us the pulse of what was happening to the population. They haven't received any information, ”Hernández told DailyMail.com via SMS on Friday.

All of the facilities they usually visit have been closed and abandoned on the street. The fact that Caracol came out was a great opportunity for COVID-19 to be prevented. & # 39;

When El Caracol came into contact with homeless people in Mexico City, he noticed that most of them had no access to water, which made them even more exposed to the disease.

“Water is now a fundamental element of this COVID-19 pandemic because we have to wash our hands again and again. You don't have it, ”said Hernandez.

“We also put water on the street so they can wash their hands when we work with them. Caracol is an organization that not only has mutual affection for them, but we know that we can do important work to protect their rights and in this case protect their lives. & # 39;

In addition to looking for donations to continue his outreach program, Hernández was also looking for donors who can deliver food that doesn't necessarily need to be cooked.

The virus killed 1,754 people and generated 16,758 confirmed cases in Mexico City.

El Caracol volunteers attended workshops to learn more about the coronavirus epidemic and how to identify potential cases

El Caracol volunteers attended workshops to learn more about the coronavirus epidemic and how to identify potential cases

A volunteer at El Caracol provides literature in the form of a brochure to educate the homeless about the devastating coronavirus pandemic

A volunteer at El Caracol provides literature in the form of a brochure to educate the homeless about the devastating coronavirus pandemic

advertising