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80% of new Covid 19 cases in part of Greater Manchester are whites


According to a local official, 80 percent of new Covid 19 cases in part of Greater Manchester are white.

Eleanor Roaf, director of public health in Trafford, said there was concern from a "smug middle class."

She fears that white people believe that the coronavirus only affects people in disadvantaged areas and people with a black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME).

A number of health chiefs in other parts of Greater Manchester said that most of the new cases had occurred there.

However, in Trafford, where the infection rate tripled within a week, the cases are concentrated in the “beautiful green suburbs”.

In the past few weeks, 17- to 22-year-olds have signed up for testing, followed by those in their 30s, 40s, and 50s.

Ms. Roaf suspects that young people go to pubs and bars and then pass on the coronavirus to their parents.

Trafford and eight other Greater Manchester authorities are among the 20 areas with the highest infection rates in England, according to official figures.

The weekly infection rate with coronaviruses – the number of cases diagnosed per 100,000 people – in Trafford has risen from 14.2 in a report published on July 23 to 36.8 in the latest figures released on Friday in Trafford within 14 days Public Health England doubled

The infection rate in Oldham, the second most affected agency in England, has also increased - from 18.3 to 54.3

The infection rate in Oldham, the second most affected agency in England, has also increased – from 18.3 to 54.3

Manchester City's Covid 19 fall rate was 21 at the end of June and decreased slightly in the first few weeks of July. But it has risen from 13 to 22.1 in the past fortnight

Manchester City's Covid 19 fall rate was 21 at the end of June and decreased slightly in the first few weeks of July. But it has risen from 13 to 22.1 in the past fortnight

Infection rates released yesterday by health officials - for the period July 25-31 - show how cases are increasing in all but three of Greater Manchester's ten districts

Infection rates released yesterday by health officials – for the period July 25-31 – show how cases are increasing in all but three of Greater Manchester's ten districts

This graph shows the number of infections in Greater Manchester from July 1 to 29, two days before the new blocking measures are reintroduced

This graph shows the number of infections in Greater Manchester from July 1 to 29, two days before the new blocking measures are reintroduced

The Greater Manchester Police (GMP) and local government officials said a serious incident on Sunday was concerned about rising infection rates in the region.

The move took place at the beginning of a week when it is expected that more people will move to parks, pubs and private gardens in warmer weather.

It followed new lockdown style rules in Greater Manchester, as well as parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire, on Friday.

Ministers announced that people in these areas would no longer be allowed to visit other people's homes as data indicated that cases were being driven by household socialization.

The CORONAVIRUS RATE IN THE NORTHWEST COULD be as high as 1.1

Coronavirus reproduction rates could be as high as 1.1, according to figures released yesterday in the north west of England. According to separate data, infections in sealed parts of Greater Manchester have doubled within a week.

Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine estimate that the R-value has risen significantly above the danger zone in the North West, where 4.5 million people have been subjected to stringent new blocking measures last week due to an increase in cases.

The R – which is the average number of people to whom an infected Covid-19 patient passes on the disease – must remain below 1, otherwise the virus will start to grow exponentially.

Data compiled by the university's Center for Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases suggests that cases in the region could double within 56 days if the R rate is not squeezed.

However, the estimates are somewhat out of date due to a delay in the calculation of the reproduction rate, which means that they only last until July 18. An effect that the lock of the past week may have had on the R value is not shown in the numbers for several weeks.

Separate worrying numbers released today by Public Health England show that infection rates increased in nine out of ten districts in Manchester between 22nd and 29th July two days before the new regulations were introduced.

Rochdale was the only place where the cases weren't on the rise, but after a weekend of closures, infections have also occurred in Wigan and Bolton.

In Oldham, the second worst affected part of England, 148 cases were recorded during the week. The rate rose from 41.6 to 62.8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Manchester and Tameside prices more than doubled in seven days.

Much of the reporting of the increase in infections in the region has focused on Oldham, which has the second highest infection rate in England.

Local health officials said last week that two-thirds of the new cases (261 in the past two weeks) occurred in the city's Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities.

There followed news that around 85 percent of new cases in the UK's most affected agency – Blackburn with Darwen in Lancashire – were among the South Asian population.

But in Trafford, a wealthy area that extends to the outskirts of Greater Manchester, most new cases – about 162 in the past two weeks – are white people, Ms. Roaf has revealed.

"Ninety-two percent of the cases were of ethnic origin, and 80 percent of these were white," she told The Guardian.

& # 39; The Trafford narrative says that it is a very white outbreak in Trafford. In other places, the narrative is very different.

"One of the concerns is that we don't end up with a smug white middle class that thinks they are not affected because they think that ethnic minority families are overcrowded."

Public health statistics show that BAME populations have higher death and infection rates than other populations.

Health experts say this could be partly due to major health inequalities and underlying health problems, as well as cultural and traditional differences.

Asians often have larger families living with older generations in smaller townhouses, with many working in public jobs like the NHS or taxi drivers, creating a higher risk of household transmission.

This could lead to car accidents in some parts of Greater Manchester, Ms. Roaf said, particularly in Rochdale, Oldham and Blackburn.

In the BBC Newcast podcast, Ms. Roaf said, “In areas with very large households, quite a few people mingle, and quite often they work in jobs where they have many personal contacts. & # 39;

But in Trafford, "infection rates are spreading by people who are on the go and who may relax the nightlife."

Ms. Roaf said the data suggests that young people catch the coronavirus after going to bars and pubs before passing it on to their parents.

“When we saw households with a high degree of infection, it was parents with a few children. We have seen no spread between these three and four generation households.

“I suspect that the young people are more of what they said (about NHS contact tracers).

Eleanor Roaf, director of public health in Trafford, said there was concern from a "smug middle class" in Trafford. Pictured: Groups of people - including eight women who appear to be celebrating a hen - were introduced to a drink meeting in the city center on Sunday

Eleanor Roaf, director of public health in Trafford, said there was concern from a "smug middle class" in Trafford. Pictured: Groups of people – including eight women who appear to be celebrating a hen – were introduced to a drink meeting in the city center on Sunday

Ms. Roaf suspects that young people go to pubs and bars and then pass on the coronavirus to their parents. Pictured: A group of friends in the city hugging on Wilmslow Road in Manchester, which was packed on Saturday night

Ms. Roaf suspects that young people go to pubs and bars and then pass on the coronavirus to their parents. Pictured: A group of friends in the city hugging on Wilmslow Road in Manchester, which was packed on Saturday night

“It's in beautiful green suburbs around Trafford, not in our underprivileged population. It's common, and that's what worries me.

"I am really worried that the white people may hear the news and think," Oh, this is not about me, I can continue to do whatever I want. "And actually no, you can't, nobody can. & # 39;

Dr. Ben Ainsworth, a psychologist at Bath University, generally said that young people are more at risk of going out and mingling with other people.

He told MailOnline: “We know that people are constantly weighing how much they can follow guidelines and how much they need. It's called risk perception.

“Young people see a less immediate risk of becoming infected with the virus. And to be honest, the previous guidelines are not aimed at young people.

"So we really need to make sure that clear advice is available, accessible, and relevant to their contexts."

Dr. Ainsworth, who helped launch the government-funded Germ Defense website, said of this perception of risk among people living in deprived areas: “More deprived communities will find this a challenge. They may not have a job that they cannot do at home.

"Even if you think risk is really important, but you have to go to work to eat, you will go to work."

The infection rate in Manchester City was around 12 cases per 100,000 people in July, before almost doubling in the last week of the month.

Public Health England data shows that there were 22.1 cases per 100,000 in the week ending July 31.

Infection rates increased in nine out of ten districts in Manchester between July 22 and 29, two days before the new regulations were introduced. which led to sudden restrictions announced late Thursday evening.

Oldham, which announced its own tightening two days earlier, has the highest infection rate in Greater Manchester, with 54.3 cases per 100,000 people in the week ending July 31.

This is followed by Trafford (36.8), Rochdale (32.7), Manchester (22.1), Stockport (16.5), Salford (18.1), Tameside (15.5), Bolton (14), Bury (12.1).

Rochdale is the only place where cases aren't on the rise, but after a weekend of closures, infections have also occurred in Wigan and Bolton.

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