ENTERTAINMENT

& # 39; Snubbed & # 39; Archbishop Will Receive His Reputation: Downing St Delayed Honor For John Sentamu


Britain's first black archbishop was prevented from receiving lifelong peerage because officials wanted to make sure he was not criticized in an abuse investigation.

Former Archbishop of York, Dr. John Sentamu, was originally added to a list of 36 new members this summer.

According to a government source, the honor for the esteemed clergyman has been delayed by the House of Lords Appointments Commission (Holac), which is reviewing the nominations.

The 71-year-old Archbishop of York, John Sentamu, was to be cohabited so that he could continue to sit in the House of Lords after retiring on June 7th

His successor Stephen Cottrell said he was "concerned" at the news that John Sentamu would not be given a seat in the House of Lords

It withheld approval while the Church of England was investigated by the Independent Child Sexual Abuse Investigation.

But yesterday it was reported that Dr. Sentamu, 71, would receive immediate peerage.

The source said: “There was never any indication that the archbishop was involved in or covered up the scandal. But he was a high-ranking figure in the Church who was in ongoing process. So there has been a delay. & # 39;

"It is troubling to find out today that, negligently or deliberately, my predecessor + Sentamu has not received the nobility that has been common for many years," said Archbishop Cottrell in a tweet prior to his enthronement at York Minster

While there is no automatic right for archbishops to be cohabiting, Sentamus Snubbing broke a tradition where his predecessor, Lord Hope, and the last Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams (pictured), were made companions

While there is no automatic right for archbishops to be cohabiting, Sentamus Snubbing broke a tradition where his predecessor, Lord Hope, and the last Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams (pictured), were peers

Labor MP David Lammy accused the government of showing "obvious institutional bias" in seizing Sentamu (pictured, Eddie Izzard awarded his honorary degree from York St John University)

Labor MP David Lammy accused the government of showing "obvious institutional bias" in seizing Sentamu (pictured, Eddie Izzard awarded his honorary degree from York St John University)

Downing Street had apparently always intended to ennoble the former archbishop.

A source added, "Everyone recognizes their great contribution, and the peerage has never been in doubt." With this, Dr. Sentamu continued to sit in the House of Lords after retiring in June.

The peerage list announced in July included ex-Brexit party's former communist Claire Fox, a former communist, the prime minister's brother Jo Johnson, and Sir Ian Botham.

Politicians had given the initial nudge to Dr. Sentamu criticized.

Labor MP Alex Sobel tweeted, “Probably the greatest CoE bishop in my life. That is pure and simple racism. & # 39; Stephen Lowe, the former Bishop of Hulme, told Times Radio that Dr. Sentamu is a "remarkable man".

He added: "He was never afraid to speak out against racism, against poverty, against injustice."

Lord Newby, leader of the Liberal Democrats in the House of Lords, said # 10 fill the Lords with people who do not deserve to be in Sentamus' shadow. According to Operation Black Vote, only 12 of the 794 peers in the Lords are of black descent.

Lord Woolley, founder of the lobby group, said, "John Sentamu is a hero and a role model."

York's new Archbishop Stephen Cottrell, 62, was officially enthroned at a service streamed on social media by the York minister yesterday.

He is the 98th to hold the title – the second highest post in the Church of England.

During the service, the father of three spoke of his desire to change the facility in light of the recent abuse investigation.

It's not clear why Sentamu, who voted for Remain in the EU referendum but later voted for Theresa May's vacation deal, didn't get a life comparison despite the government claiming it should cut the number in the House of Lords

It is not clear why Sentamu, who voted for Remain in the EU referendum but later voted for Theresa May's vacation agreement, did not get a life comparison despite the government claiming it should reduce the number in the House of Lords

Last year Sentamu publicly reprimanded politicians and accused the government of stifling social reconciliation.

He and Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, said "social divisions feel more solid and insoluble than they have been in many years".

They expressed concern about "Divisions within major political parties that are stifling the emergence of a hopeful and viable vision for the common good in our communities."

Sentamu then spoke out to explain why he was supporting Brexit despite choosing Remain.

He wrote that a second referendum would cause "an already discredited political class that poses a very great threat to the future British government to lose confidence".

He added: "A permanent loss of confidence in state institutions always leads to unrest and violence."

Social media users have turned to Twitter to accuse the government of racism for failing to cohabitate Sentamu.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced in July a list of 36 peers, including his brother, former MP Jo Johnson and MP Claire Fox, publicly defending an IRA attack.

At the time, SNP MP Pete Wishart said the move was "the worst kind of cronyism" when he accused the prime minister of "giving jobs for life to friends and those who did him favors".

Social media users have turned to Twitter to accuse the government of racism for failing to cohabitate Sentamu

Social media users have turned to Twitter to accuse the government of racism for not lending Sentamu a significant other

According to Operation Black Vote, only 12 of the 794 peers in the Lords are black, including activist Doreen Lawrence (Stephen Lawrence's mother), actress and politician Floella Benjamin, and Labor MP Paul Boateng.

Sentamu, who refused to comment on the situation, was told that he would be considered for peerage on June 26. However, on July 31, he was told he had missed it and would have to wait until the next round.

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