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£ 3,200 Face Mask Avoidance Fine: The £ 100 payment is further doubled for repeat offenders


The repeated refusal to wear a face mask could result in a fine of up to £ 3,200, Boris Johnson announced last night.

Currently, those who do not cover their faces in shops or on public transport can be fined £ 100 – or £ 50 if they pay within 14 days.

But the Prime Minister said those caught without a mask for the second time will now be fined £ 200, with the amount doubling to a maximum of £ 3,200 with each repetition.

As part of stricter regulations to prevent a second wave of coronavirus, organizers of illegal raves are fined up to £ 10,000. The harsh fines apply to anyone who organizes illegal gatherings of more than 30 people.

At the same time, however, the prime minister said bowling alleys, ice rinks and casinos are allowed to open and beauty salons, tattoo parlors, spas and hairdressers can offer close contact services.

Wedding receptions for up to 30 people will resume and indoor performances with socially distant audiences will resume.

The Prime Minister said those caught without a mask for the second time will now be fined £ 200, with the amount doubling on each repetition to a maximum of £ 3,200

Mr Johnson said, “Most of the people in this country are sticking to the rules and doing their part to fight the virus, but we need to stay focused and we cannot be complacent.

“That's why we're strengthening enforcement powers against those who repeatedly break the rules.

"At each stage I have said that our plan to reopen society and the economy is conditional and based on continuous progress against the virus. Today we can announce some more changes that will allow more people to get back to work and the public to get back to the things they missed.

"However, as I have always said, we will not hesitate to slow down if necessary or continue to take local action to control the spread of the virus." Masks became mandatory on June 15 in public transport and in stores on June 24.

However, over the weekend it emerged that only 33 fines have been imposed since June 15. This despite the fact that the police stopped nearly 30,000 people to warn them that they had not covered their faces.

Currently, those who do not cover their faces in shops or on public transport can be fined £ 100 - or £ 50 if they pay within 14 days (Image: Yorkshire, Aug 13).

Currently, those who do not cover their faces in shops or on public transport can be fined £ 100 – or £ 50 if they pay within 14 days (Image: Yorkshire, Aug 13).

Currently, those who don't cover their faces in shops or on public transport can be fined £ 100 - or £ 50 if they pay within 14 days (Photo: An underground commuter).

Currently, those who don't cover their faces in shops or on public transport can be fined £ 100 – or £ 50 if they pay within 14 days (Photo: An underground commuter).

Masks are not required for children under 11, people with breathing difficulties, people with disabilities who make it difficult to wear or remove a face covering, and those traveling with or helping someone who needs lip reading.

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said: "We have introduced mandatory face covers for public transport to protect people and stop the spread of coronavirus. I am grateful to everyone who stuck to it, and of course many people have legitimate reasons not to wear face-covering – but there is no excuse for those who are not exempt. So we have to be tougher on repeat offenders.

3.4 m & # 39; have antibodies & # 39;

More than 3 million people in England had coronavirus – 12 times the number of confirmed cases, according to a large study.

A mass home testing program led by Imperial College London found that just under 6 percent of the country's population – around 3.4 million – had antibodies to Covid-19 by mid-July.

This compares to the government count of just over 270,000 officially tested for the virus during the pandemic.

Those who live in London, work in nursing homes and health care, live in large households and are from ethnic minorities are most likely infected with the virus.

More than 100,000 volunteers participated in the world's largest home testing program. A drop of blood is used to check for antibodies.

"This new system is designed to ensure that anyone who is not exempt wears face-covering for public transport and continues the excellent efforts of the public to help this country recover."

Police forces across England and Wales have already stepped up patrols to prevent illegal gatherings in problem areas such as Leicester and Greater Manchester, where operations were sometimes larger than on New Years Eve.

Last weekend the West Midlands Police shut down 125 parties and raves and closed one pub to stop illegal gatherings and anti-social behavior. Home Secretary Priti Patel said: “Coronavirus remains a real and current threat to us all and the majority of the UK public is doing the right thing. I'm not going to watch these sacrifices undermined by a small minority of senseless individuals.

"These measures send a clear message – if you don't cooperate with the police and endanger our health, action will follow."

n Wearing face coverings in public could help reduce the number of Covid-19 deaths by 5 percent, researchers have found.

Those who use even a simple cloth to protect their nose and mouth can help reduce the number of deaths significantly.

Scientists say if this were combined with distributing surgical masks to the elderly and people with symptoms, the effect could be doubled.

The study by scientists at the Broad Institute in Massachusetts and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan concluded that the introduction of universal face coverings resulted in a "significant reduction" in the total number of deaths. Surgical masks are considered three times more effective than homemade masks.

The NHS waiting times reached a record high

Coronavirus has put a "wrecking ball" on waiting times for the NHS. The record numbers are facing delays in routine treatments, numbers show.

The number of people waiting more than 18 weeks for scheduled surgeries and treatments exceeded 1.85 million in June, the highest since records began in December 2007.

More than 50,000 have waited more than a year, compared to 1,613 in February. Referrals for cancer have also decreased by a fifth compared to the previous year.

Only 48 people were treated on time in England, compared to more than a thousand a month last year, figures from NHS England show. Hospitals have been urged to try to catch up in the summer, when virus cases are lower.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President of the Royal College of Surgeons in England, said: “Covid has brought a wrecking ball to wait time targets.

"Each of these numbers represents a different patient waiting in distress and possibly in pain."

This week Boris Johnson announced that NHS trusts in England will be given £ 300 million to modernize facilities before winter to keep vital services up and reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection.

France's SUNDAY airlift canceled: Holiday chaos for 400,000 Brits as they are told they will have to be quarantined for two weeks while Covid cases occur – visitors to Holland, Malta and parts of the Caribbean are also affected

  • The British government has quarantined France, which is due to arrive at 4 a.m. on Sunday
  • A review of UK quarantine rules is expected to be completed today
  • France is expected to remain on the exception list despite increasing Covid cases
  • The Netherlands and Malta are at a higher risk of being subject to the regulations

France was put on the UK's quarantine list today, dealt a severe blow to tens of thousands of British vacationers.

After a week of speculation ministers responding to a worsening coronavirus situation across the channel, ministers ordered travelers returning from the popular destination to isolate for 14 days.

The quarantine will come in at 4 a.m. on Sunday – and with an estimated 500,000 British vacationers in France, a weekend of chaos is looming.

France recorded 2,669 new cases of coronavirus today, up from 2,524 on Wednesday. It's a record number for the nation since emerging from lockdown.

The move came after Boris Johnson said the UK was "ruthless" when it comes to quarantining travel, even with its "closest and dearest friends".

“We have to be absolutely ruthless, even with our closest and dearest friends and partners. I think everyone understands, "Johnson told reporters as he visited Northern Ireland today.

& # 39; We'll look at the dates a little later this afternoon – right where France and other countries arrive.

“We can't even remotely complain about our own situation. Everyone understands that in a pandemic you will not allow our populations to be infected again or the disease to recur.

"That is why the quarantine measures are very important and we have to apply them very strictly."

Today's regulatory review has put the Netherlands, Monaco and Malta on the quarantine list – and Portugal remains on that list, along with Spain.

The Turks and Caicos Islands as well as Aruba in the Caribbean have also lost their place.

The Prime Minister spoke on a visit to Northern Ireland this afternoon before anticipating which nations to put on the restricted travel list

The Prime Minister spoke on a visit to Northern Ireland this afternoon before anticipating which nations to put on the restricted travel list

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travelers coming to the UK are currently exempted from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, as well as the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 residents in each country. There is growing speculation that France could be removed from the list of excluded countries, but there are a number of other countries with higher or similar numbers

Speculation about the removal of quarantine exemptions has increased as infections rise across much of Europe.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on vacation or planning to travel to France, but more than 2,500 cases were recorded yesterday – a record since the lockdown was eased.

The country appears dangerously close to the scale of 20 cases per 100,000 people over a seven-day period.

However, ministers are believed to be ready to halt restrictions if changes are announced today, with the situation being closely monitored.

The quarantine list already includes Spain and Portugal. It is believed that Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have not yet approved the adjustments.

Travelers are expected to be notified of changes approximately 30 hours in advance so they can make new arrangements if necessary.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on vacation or planning to travel to France, but more than 2,500 cases were recorded yesterday - a record since the lockdown was eased. In the picture Cergy-Pontoise, northwest of Paris

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on vacation or planning to travel to France, but more than 2,500 cases were recorded yesterday – a record since the lockdown was eased. In the picture Cergy-Pontoise, northwest of Paris

The Netherlands (23.1 per 100,000), Gibraltar (35.6), Monaco (38.2), Malta (46.7), San Marino (53.0), the Faroe Islands (198.5), Turks and Caicos Islands (278.9) and Aruba (547.9) all have higher new cases per 100,000 values ​​than France.

On the list with a slightly lower rate than France are Denmark (15.3 per 100,000), Iceland (14.7), the Czech Republic (14.0), Switzerland (13.3) and Poland (12.7) .

All of this has exceeded the Portuguese rate of 12.4 new cases per 100,000 people in the past seven days. Even so, Portugal remains on the list of countries from which all arrivals to the UK, including those returning from vacation, must be quarantined for two weeks.

Downing Street reminded prospective vacationers this week that "there is no risk-free way to travel overseas," and Boris Johnson added that he "would not hesitate" to introduce travel restrictions to other countries.

The latest data on foreign soil coronavirus cases is being analyzed by the government's Joint Biosecurity Center (JCB), which reports to Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

Brits in France and other countries could be forced to flee home or they could be quarantined on their return to the UK if the government decides to remove more countries from the list.

Although Portugal has had a lower rate of new Covid-19 cases in the past seven days than a number of countries on the government's exception list, travelers entering the UK from Portugal must self-isolate upon arrival in the UK. Pictured: Beach goers crowd at Praia da Duquesa in Cascais, Portugal. on August 9th, 2020 when tourism is slowly returning

Although Portugal has had a lower rate of new Covid-19 cases in the past seven days than a number of countries on the government's exception list, travelers entering the UK from Portugal must self-isolate upon arrival in the UK. Pictured: Beach goers crowd at Praia da Duquesa in Cascais, Portugal. on August 9th, 2020 when tourism is slowly returning

UK ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a variety of countries amid an increase in European coronavirus cases

UK ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a variety of countries amid an increase in European coronavirus cases

The Netherlands is one of the countries exempted from the UK's quarantine rules but has seen a rate of 23.1 new cases per 100,000 people over the past week - a higher rate than France

The Netherlands is one of the countries exempted from the UK's quarantine rules but has seen a rate of 23.1 new cases per 100,000 people over the past week – a higher rate than France

On Tuesday, the UK updated its "green list" for travel but did not remove Portugal from the quarantine list, a blow to the country's economy, which has benefited greatly from UK tourism.

The British government was warned that the cases in Portugal had not fallen fast enough to safely put the country on the "green list".

On Monday, France reported the first significant increase in the number of coronavirus patients in the hospital since the lockdown was lifted, although it fell again on Tuesday before rising two days after the rebound.

France's Prime Minister Jean Castex (pictured in a Montpellier hospital this week) has told citizens to "pull themselves together" amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases in France

France's Prime Minister Jean Castex (pictured in a Montpellier hospital this week) has told citizens to "pull themselves together" amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases in France

Earlier this week, the French prime minister urged citizens to pull themselves together amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases.

Jean Castex said the public is becoming negligent and has sparked the specter of a second lockdown after rising more than 10,000 cases in the past week.

"If we do not act together, we expose ourselves to the increased risk that the upswing of the epidemic will be difficult to control," said Castex during a visit to an intensive care unit in southern France.

Some parts of France have tightened their mask rules despite the summer heat wave. The police will now step up controls on face coverings – while neighboring Belgium today has mandated masks in all public spaces, including outdoors.

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