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2ft 10in woman warned that baby could "crush" her welcomes son


A 2ft 10in woman who was warned by doctors that a baby could "crush her inside out" has resisted the chances of welcoming a son with her 6ft 1in husband.

Trisha Taylor, 31, of Boise, Idaho, was diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) as a baby after she was born with 150 broken bones.

The condition caused by a genetic mutation that affects the production of collagen means that bones are brittle and easily fragile.

But Trisha has refused to be held back and worked tirelessly to strengthen her strength so that she can move her wheelchair and get out of bed on her own.

Over time, she met her 31-year-old husband Michael and married him. However, because her bones are so fragile that a simple cough or sneeze can break them, she was warned not to have a child.

But incredibly, after two heartbreaking miscarriages, she managed to get her son Maven to 32 weeks – before he was given a c-section – and she's now a healthy, thriving four-year-old who has no OI.

Idaho's 2ft 10in Trisha Taylor was warned by doctors that a baby could "crush" her but resisted the chance to welcome a son, Maven (pictured), with her 6ft 1in husband

Trisha has refused to be held back and worked tirelessly to strengthen her strength so that she can move her wheelchair and get out of bed on her own. She is pictured with husband Michael

Over time, Trisha met her 31-year-old husband Michael and married him. However, because her bones are so fragile that a simple cough or sneeze can break them, she was warned not to have a child. She is pictured with her husband and child

Trisha, seen on left with husband Michael, 31, and on right with their son, was born with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), which makes her bones so fragile that a simple cough can break them

She added that she recently started her own blog called "And She Did" to inspire others. Full-time mom Trisha said, "When I told my doctor I was going to stop birth control, he sat me down and warned me about getting pregnant." .

"I remember the word" could "was tossed around a lot -" You could die, the baby might die "…"

& # 39; But I don't have time for "could" and after a lot of hard work I have welcomed my perfect boy.

“To this day people cannot believe that I gave birth to him. They ask if Maven is my baby and I always tell them – very proudly – "Yes, it grew in my tummy".

What is Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

Osteogenesis Imperfecta, also known as OI or Brittle Bones Disease, is a lifelong genetic disorder that is very rare, occurring between 1 in 20,000 and 1 in 50,000 births.

The disorder disrupts the body's ability to create strong connective tissue and grow new bone tissue.

It occurs where there is a lack of good quality collagen, the protein that frames the bones.

As a result, the bones, as well as other features including the teeth and cartilage, can lack flexibility and strength, making them more prone to fracture.

Collagen also occurs in the sclera, the white part of the eye, and a lack of protein can give people with OI a blue tint in their eyes.

Children with OI can also develop severe scoliosis, which is a curvature of the spine and can have hearing and heart problems.

While there are medications out there that try to strengthen the bones, there is no treatment to help alleviate the condition on its own.

After two heartbreaking miscarriages, she managed to get her son Maven to 32 weeks - before he was delivered by Caesarean section - and she is now a healthy, thriving four-year-old who has no OI

After two heartbreaking miscarriages, she managed to get her son Maven to 32 weeks – before he was delivered by Caesarean section – and she is now a healthy, thriving four-year-old who has no OI

Born on August 3, 1989, weighing 6 pounds - with arms and legs flexed - an X-ray just a few hours old showed she had broken 150 of her bones. She is now pictured with son Maven at the age of 31

Born on August 3, 1989, weighing 6 pounds – with arms and legs flexed – an X-ray just a few hours old showed she had broken 150 of her bones. She is now pictured with son Maven at the age of 31

Born on August 3, 1989, weighing 6 pounds – with arms and legs flexed – an X-ray just a few hours old showed she had broken 150 of her bones.

Shortly thereafter, she was diagnosed with OI through a blood test designed to detect the specific genetic mutations associated with the disease.

The main characteristic of the condition is that it causes bone fractures with minimal impact. However, other symptoms include hypermobile joints, shortened height, problems with tooth formation, joint pain, and hearing problems.

Because her bones are too weak to support her body, Trisha has been using a wheelchair for two and a half years.

But she was always determined that OI – also known as fragile bone disease – would not set her apart from her peers.

She said, “I've never known anything else, so it's completely normal for me to be in a wheelchair.

“When I grew up in a small town, I had pretty much the same classmates in junior and high school, so it was perfectly normal for them too.

“I was not raised as disabled and no one in my school saw me as disabled.

The main characteristic of the condition is that it causes bone fractures with minimal impact. However, other symptoms include hypermobile joints, shortened height, problems with tooth formation, joint pain, and hearing problems. Trisha uses a wheelchair, she is pictured with her son Maven

The main characteristic of the condition is that it causes bone fractures with minimal impact. However, other symptoms include hypermobile joints, shortened height, problems with tooth formation, joint pain, and hearing problems. Trisha uses a wheelchair, she is pictured with her son Maven

Since her bones are too weak to support her body, Trisha has been using a wheelchair for two and a half years. She is now pictured with son Maven

Trisha was always determined that OI - also known as brittle bone disease - would not set her apart from her peers and refuse to be treated as disabled. She is now pictured with son Maven

Since her bones are too weak to support her body, Trisha has been using a wheelchair for two and a half years. But she was always determined that OI – also known as brittle bone disease – would not set her apart from her peers and refuse to be treated as disabled

"Sometimes when a new child started they would try to choose me, but my colleagues would take care of me."

Although she was never treated differently by her friends or family, Trisha's everyday life was fraught with challenges.

Her bones were so fragile at least once a month that even breathing put too much strain on her chest, which meant she had to be plugged into an oxygen machine 24 hours a day from birth.

Trisha said, “My lungs couldn't breathe in and out on their own.

Every time I cough or sneeze, I risked a broken bone. Just lying in the wrong position can lead to a break. & # 39;

At the age of 12, Trisha began a new treatment that involved going to the hospital for three days every three months, where she was given pamidronate – a drug that reduces bone loss.

She added, "It was a relatively new treatment at the time, and my mother was given the opportunity to get into it."

Since her bones are too weak to support her body, Trisha has been using a wheelchair for two and a half years. She is pictured with her husband

Since her bones are too weak to support her body, Trisha has been using a wheelchair for two and a half years. She is pictured with her husband

She described how the treatment – which spanned five years – changed her life and explained that her loved ones once again played an important role.

She said, “It was amazing to feel the strength build up in my bones.

After six months I was able to sit up without any help.

“When I was 13 I asked my parents if I could try to get out of bed on my own, but I think they were too scared. They didn't want me to hurry.

Instead, I asked a couple of my friends to come over and help. We locked ourselves in the bedroom and they helped me get out of bed by myself.

“We kept practicing and practicing until I did it – it must have taken half a day.

“I remember showing it to my parents the next morning. They were shocked but proud. & # 39;

The treatment also meant that by the age of 15, Trisha became strong enough to breathe on her own and now only uses her oxygen tank when she sleeps.

By the age of 17, she was able to do a slew of chores – including going to the bathroom and maneuvering a power wheelchair – that enabled her to live independently.

Although she was never treated differently by her friends or family, Trisha's everyday life was fraught with challenges. Her bones were so fragile at least once a month that even breathing put too much strain on her chest, which meant she had to be plugged into an oxygen machine 24 hours a day from birth. She is now pictured with son Maven

Although she was never treated differently by her friends or family, Trisha's everyday life was fraught with challenges. Her bones were so fragile at least once a month that even breathing put too much strain on her chest, which meant she had to be plugged into an oxygen machine 24 hours a day from birth. She is now pictured with son Maven

At the age of 12, Trisha began a new treatment that involved going to the hospital for three days every three months, where she was given pamidronate - a drug that reduced bone loss and changed her life. She is now pictured as an adult with her son Maven

At the age of 12, Trisha began a new treatment that required hospitalization for three days every three months, where she was given pamidronate – a drug that reduced bone loss and changed her life. She is now pictured as an adult with her son Maven

A year later, in 2007, she landed at the College of South Idaho and studied social work.

In her first year there, she met her future husband Michael, who was studying an apprenticeship.

She recalled, “Michael and I lived in the same dormitories, and my friend pointed this out to him for months.

She whispered in my ear forever and told me how amazing and cute he was.

“We started hanging out when we were three, but he just seemed to want to hang out the two of us.

“We became a couple almost by chance, spent a lot of time alone and visited each other's family.

"Six months later, I decided that enough was enough, so I texted him and said, 'See, are we going out or not? ".

“I knew he was interested in me, but I wouldn't treat him like a friend if he didn't make it official – so he did.

& # 39; He was my first serious friend. I had tried to meet men in the past but they were uncomfortable with my condition.

“They would make assumptions about me – that we couldn't get married or have children.

& # 39; Michael was very different. We talked about having kids and he said it wasn't a deal breaker for him. & # 39;

By the age of 17, Trisha was able to do a whole host of tasks - including going to the bathroom and maneuvering an electric wheelchair - that enabled her to live independently. A year later, in 2007, she landed at the College of South Idaho and studied social work. In her first year there, she met her future husband Michael, who was studying an apprenticeship. She is now pictured with her husband and son

By the age of 17, Trisha was able to do a whole host of tasks – including going to the bathroom and maneuvering an electric wheelchair – that enabled her to live independently. A year later, in 2007, she landed at the College of South Idaho and studied social work. In her first year there, she met her future husband Michael, who was studying an apprenticeship. She is now pictured with her husband and son

From there, the couple became an official item in June 2008 and moved in together just three months later.

"Technically, we were already living together in halls when we met," laughed Trisha. "Getting our own place didn't seem like a big deal."

Their relationship grew stronger. In May 2009, loved ones got engaged last year.

In May 2009, Trisha and Micheal got engaged during their senior year at college. They welcomed their son (pictured on the day he was born) in 2016

In May 2009, Trisha and Micheal got engaged during their senior year at college. They welcomed their son (pictured on the day he was born) in 2016

"Michael took me out with a horse and a carriage," Trisha recalled. & # 39; It was very romantic, but most of all it was a surprise.

“It took him so long to make it official. I thought we would never get married.

"But dating less than a year and he had put a ring on it."

After Trisha and Michael tied the knot in a country garden on June 18, 2011, they soon settled into a married life.

Explaining how other people react to their relationship, she continued, “No one has ever been intentionally rude to us, but people – strangers or friends – will ask personal questions about us.

“They are mainly interested in our sex life and how it works. Just because I'm disabled doesn't mean I have to answer that question – it's rude.

“People will have a double attitude, but I'm not afraid to call them and talk to them.

“It's about educating people and raising awareness. Either you're on my team or I don't care what you think. & # 39;

In 2014, after three years of marriage, Trisha made the decision to abandon birth control and start looking for a baby. However, she was warned by doctors that pregnancy could be dangerous due to the extreme pressure a growing fetus would put on her bones. However, in 2016 she welcomed a healthy son (they are pictured together).

In 2014, after three years of marriage, Trisha made the decision to abandon birth control and start looking for a baby. However, she was warned by doctors that pregnancy could be dangerous due to the extreme pressure a growing fetus would put on her bones. However, in 2016 she welcomed a healthy son (they are pictured together).

In 2014, after three years of marriage, Trisha made the decision to abandon birth control and start looking for a baby.

However, she was warned by doctors that pregnancy could be dangerous due to the extreme pressure a growing fetus would put on her bones.

An OI can pose an increased risk to the mother and child, including bleeding from the birth canal and placenta rupture.

Trisha said, “My doctor warned me that my baby could physically break my bones as I grew – and crush me from the inside out.

"I told him I wanted specific examples and what he believed would happen, not what might."

After two heartbreaking miscarriages, Trisha finally welcomed Maven in May 2016

After two heartbreaking miscarriages, Trisha finally welcomed Maven in May 2016

In the end, nothing was guaranteed so I went home and started trying.

“I wanted to be a mother so bad that nothing else was considered.

"It was my decision and no one would stop me – not even Michael."

In May 2014, Trisha was overjoyed to discover that she was expecting.

She recalled, “I was late for my period and I was sick.

“I was in the bathroom and when I saw that the test was positive I started crying, I was so excited.

I told Michael and he hugged me but was very calm. I could see he was worried about me, but two days later he was speaking baby names. & # 39;

Unfortunately, Trisha miscarried just three weeks later.

Trisha explained how other people react to their relationship, explaining that the main thing people want to know is their sex life. She is pictured with her husband and son

Trisha explained how other people react to their relationship, explaining that the main thing people want to know is their sex life. She is pictured with her husband and son

"I started bleeding profusely and knew what it was," she recalled.

"We went to our local hospital and they confirmed that I had lost the baby."

In April 2015, 11 months later, Trisha was cautiously optimistic when she became pregnant for the second time.

After Trisha found that she was expecting for the third time in August 2016, she was scanned every two weeks for the first two trimesters to monitor her progress. She is pictured while pregnant

After Trisha found that she was expecting for the third time in August 2016, she was scanned every two weeks for the first two trimesters to monitor her progress. She is pictured while pregnant

But once again her joy was short-lived when story repeated itself at 12 weeks and she miscarried.

"I'm not sure it's related to my OI – doctors never did tests," she continued. "They said that the third time I miscarried they would look into it."

After Trisha found that she was expecting for the third time in August 2016, she was scanned every two weeks for the first two trimesters to monitor her progress.

To her relief, her pregnancy went well.

"The pregnancy counselor was much more supportive than the primary doctor," said Trisha.

“We took every day as it came and no special measures were taken.

This time something felt different. I was much calmer.

The doctors told me I had a caesarean section to deliver the baby.

“There was no way my body could have a natural birth. But other than that, it was like any other pregnancy. & # 39;

On March 29, 2016, Trisha delivered Marven who weighed 3 pounds 13 ounces and was perfectly healthy.

Trisha stated that she "took every day as it came" while pregnant with Maven and delivered him via ceaseran

Trisha stated that she "took every day as it came" while pregnant with Maven and delivered him via ceaseran

She said, “During pregnancy we were concerned that Maven might inherit OI, but an ultrasound at 18 weeks showed that he was growing at a healthy rate.

"When he was born, the doctors confirmed he didn't have it."

After three weeks in the hospital recovering from an infection – and luckily with no broken bones – she was sent home to start her new life as a mother.

"I remember the midwife saying to me before I left, 'Whatever you have to do to take care of your baby – you will," Trisha said.

“And she was absolutely right – you've only found one way to do this.

“I can't just jump out of bed and run to Maven when he's crying, and I think he learned that pretty quickly. He was and still is such an easy kid.

Trisha feared her son might inherit OI, but doctors have confirmed that she does not have the disease

Trisha feared her son might inherit OI, but doctors have confirmed that she does not have the disease

“Getting him in and out of the car seat was something I was never able to do successfully.

After eight months, I realized that I couldn't do it myself.

“I had to learn to ask other people. Michael would put him in the car and I would have someone to meet me.

“If he's out in the park and climbs too high, I'm not afraid to ask a stranger for help.

"I always say it takes a village to raise a child."

Having no OI, Maven was taller than his mother by the age of two, but Trisha is unimpressed and remains prouder than ever of her boy wonder.

"For me, the altitude isn't a big deal," she said. “If anything, I see that as a good sign – it means he's healthy and growing well. Michael is 6 feet 1 inches tall, of course I knew Maven was going to get tall. & # 39;

Having no OI, Maven was taller than his mother by the age of two, but Trisha is unimpressed and remains prouder than ever of her boy wonder. The family is pictured together

Having no OI, Maven was taller than his mother by the age of two, but Trisha is unimpressed and remains prouder than ever of her boy wonder. The family is pictured together

After documenting her journey on social media, Trisha has a huge following and has prompted her to start her own blog aimed at empowering other women.

"I've always been very careful about sharing my experience online," said Trisha.

“I know people can be trolled and I didn't want to get upset about cruel comments.

“But I got a lot of messages from other people like me asking about motherhood and my life.

“I knew I wanted to help people, so I started the blog so people could have access to the information. I hope to inspire all mothers, regardless of whether they have a disability, to make their dreams come true.

"If I can do it, you can do it."

The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation recommends women with OI who are considering raising a family to see a doctor first.

A spokesperson said: "It can be difficult to find a doctor who is experienced in treating women with OI or treating pregnancies in which the fetus has OI.

“In general, women with OI who are pregnant or considering pregnancy are recommended to consult an experienced obstetrician / gynecologist.

"Patient advocacy groups such as the OI Foundation (US) and the Brittle Bones Society (UK) can help connect people with health professionals who are experienced in the treatment of OI."

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