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2020 US election: Trump campaign website "seized" by hackers


Donald Trump's campaign website was "confiscated" Tuesday by hackers who claim to have evidence "completely discrediting" him as president and proving his "criminal involvement" in manipulating the 2020 election.

The message "This website has been seized" briefly appeared on the DonaldJTrump.com homepage before the website went completely offline shortly after 7:20 pm.

The message went on that the world "is fed up with the fake news spread daily by the President … it is time to allow the world to know the truth."

The hackers behind the stunt said they compromised several of the President's devices that gave them "full access" to Trump and his relatives, as well as access to confidential information.

"Strictly classified information proves that the Trump administration is involved in the development of the coronavirus," the article said.

& # 39; We have evidence that Mr Trump is being completely discredited as President, which proves his criminal involvement and collaboration with foreign actors rigging the 2020 elections. US citizens have no choice. & # 39;

The message "This website has been seized" briefly appeared on the DonaldJTrump.com homepage before the website went completely offline shortly after 7:20 pm.

The hackers behind the stunt said they compromised several of the president's devices that served them

The hackers behind the stunt said they compromised several of the President's devices that gave them "full access" to Trump and his relatives, as well as access to confidential information

The contribution continued: "Today is the day – the whole world can decide whether or not to know the truth".

The hackers then added a link to two cryptocurrency addresses associated with Monero, a "private, secure, and untraceable digital" asset.

They asked viewers of the site to make a donation to one of the sites to let the hackers know whether or not to divulge their data they supposedly have about the president.

They said which of the addresses will make the most money by the end of an unspecified deadline will determine their next move.

"When the deadline is up, we will compare the means and carry out the will of the world," the post said. "We will inform you in both cases."

The page was signed with an encryption key assigned to an email address in the nonexistent domain & # 39; planet.gov & # 39; corresponds.

Trump's website was up again at 7:45 p.m.

Trump 2020 communications director Tim Murtaugh later released a system breach statement ensuring that no sensitive data was compromised.

"Tonight the Trump campaign website has been defaced and we are working with law enforcement to investigate the source of the attack," Murtaugh wrote.

& # 39; There was no exposure to sensitive data as none of it is actually stored on the website. The website has been restored. & # 39;

Asking people to irreversibly send cryptocurrency to a mysterious address is a common type of online scam. Similar to this case, the scams usually involve brief appearances on highly visible platforms like celebrity Twitter accounts.

The hacking comes less than a week after a Dutch researcher allegedly gained access to Trump's Twitter account after correctly guessing his password "maga2020".

Victor Gevers, a security expert, said he could access Trump's direct messages, compose tweets on his behalf, and change the appearance of his profile.

Gevers – who had already managed to log into Trump in 2016 – apparently got access by guessing Trump's password only on his fifth attempt.

& # 39; I expected to get blocked after four failed attempts. Or at least be asked for additional information, ”Gevers told De Volkskrant.

However, Twitter denied the report, insisting that they had no evidence to confirm Gevers' claims.

"We have proactively implemented account security measures for a certain group of high-profile, election-related Twitter accounts in the US, including federal governments," a spokesman for the social media giant said in a statement.

However, Gevers said the ease with which he allegedly accessed Trump's account indicated that the president was not using basic security measures such as two-step verification.

Gevers suggested that VN post a tweet from Trump's account to alert the president to the lack of security on his account.

The hacker appeared to be honoring an October 16 tweet in which Trump published a satirical article about Babylon Bee.

& # 39; Twitter closes the entire network to slow down the spread of negative Biden messages https://babylonbee.com/news/twitter-shuts-down-entire-network-to-slow-spread-of-negative-biden -news via @TheBabylonBee, & # 39; Trumps Account tweeted on October 16th.

& # 39; Wow, this has never been done in history. That includes his really bad interview last night. Why is Twitter doing this? Pay more attention to Sleepy Joe & Big T. & # 39;

Babylon Bee is a satirical website that advocates Trump, but markets itself as unapologetically fake news.

Trump's tweet, apparently believing in the fictional story, immediately sparked messages asking if he was aware of this fact.

Gevers paused to confirm he was behind the tweet, but he posted a now-removed tweet indicating his involvement.

& # 39; It started six years ago. And hopefully it will be the last time in 2020, ”he wrote.

"Please enable two-factor authentication for all of your accounts."